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Steve Jobs once explained how seeking help and embracing opportunities can change your life

Jobs might have been a pioneer in the world of tech advancement but the late Apple co-founder did not reach the heights of success without seeking a little help.

Steve Jobs once explained how seeking help and embracing opportunities can change your life
Cover Image Source: Steve Jobs during an Apple special event on April 8, 2010, in Cupertino, California—Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

Steve Jobs, the late American business magnate and co-founder of Apple, is also known as the man behind some of the most stellar technological inventions of the 21st century. However, even geniuses like Jobs sought help when it was necessary. In a resurfaced clip on Twitter, originally from a 1994 interview of Jobs with the Silicon Valley Historical Association, the former chairman of Apple gave a simple explainer to "separate people who do things from the people who just dream about them."

Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds a new mini iPod at Macworld January 6, 2004 in San Francisco. Jobs announced several new products including the new iLife 4 software and the Mini iPod. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds a new mini iPod at Macworld January 6, 2004, in San Francisco. Jobs announced several new products including the new iLife 4 software and the Mini iPod—Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

The Twitter clip posted by @blakeaburge has gained over 1.5 million views so far and the interview features Jobs in his late 30s. In Job's words, "asking for help is not a sign of weakness and it separates those who do from those who just dream." Jobs recalled an old memory from when he was merely 12 years old and wanted to build a frequency counter. "I've never found anybody that didn't want to help me if I asked them for help. I called up Bill Hewlett when I was 12 years old. I said, 'Hi, I'm Steve Jobs. I'm 12 years old. I'm a student in high school. I want to build a frequency counter, and I was wondering if you have any spare parts I could have,'" Job shared in the 1994 interview.



 

Unsurprisingly enough, Jobs got a good laugh from the other side of the phone, obtained his spare computer parts from Hewlett and also bagged a job that summer at Hewlett-Packard assembly line. "I was in heaven. I've never found anyone who said no or hung up the phone when I called. I just asked. And when people ask me, I try to be responsive, to pay that debt of gratitude back," he continued. Jobs believed that this is what sets apart the doers from the dreamers. Most people are held back by their self-doubts or unwillingness to take on the opportunities which might be lying in front of them.

Image Source: Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs speaks during an Apple Special Event at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts January 27, 2010 in San Francisco, California. Apple introduced its latest creation, the iPad, a mobile tablet browsing device that is a cross between the iPhone and a MacBook laptop. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Image Source: Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs speaks during an Apple Special Event at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on January 27, 2010, in San Francisco, California. Apple introduced its latest creation, the iPad, a mobile tablet browsing device that is a cross between the iPhone and a MacBook laptop—Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

Twitter user Blake Burge also added a few pointers in the caption of Job's clip. "A simple question I've used for years that has served me well: Will I be any worse off than am I now by asking for this opportunity? If the answer is no, which I'd argue it almost always is, ––then you've got nothing to lose. If you're too afraid to ask, you're too afraid to fail. And without failure, you'll never grow. Just take action. Just ask," the caption read.

Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds the new iPhone 4 after he delivered the opening keynote address at the 2010 Apple World Wide Developers conference June 7, 2010 in San Francisco, California. Jobs kicked off their annual WWDC with the announcement of the new iPhone 4. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds the new iPhone 4 after he delivered the opening keynote address at the 2010 Apple World Wide Developers Conference on June 7, 2010, in San Francisco, California. Jobs kicked off their annual WWDC with the announcement of the new iPhone 4—Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

Even science backs up Job's thoughts about how asking for help can change everything. According to a study published in Management Science, seeking assistance can even boost how competent the person asking for help is perceived by the person asked. Jobs felt a willingness to ask for help is a predictor of success because asking for help makes it easier for you to do, not just dream. According to Harvard Business Review, Jobs' personality aided him a lot while conducting his business. Journalist Walter Isaacson wrote in the article that Jobs "acted as if normal rules did not apply to him."

"The passion, intensity, and extreme emotionalism he brought to everyday life were things he also poured into the products he made. I think the real lessons from Steve Jobs have to be drawn from looking at what he actually accomplished. Making an enduring company was both far harder and more important than making a great product," Isaacson added. Reaching out for help changed Jobs' life, so we can follow along with his famous quote which stated that "people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do."



 

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