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Woman shares love story of her two hens in a lesbian relationship in heartwarming thread

Woman shares love story of her two hens in a lesbian relationship in heartwarming thread

"They go to sleep at night separate to the other chickens, all snuggled up together, usually with one tucked under the other's wing," Dr. Amanda Brunton explained.

Love is love and there is no better reminder of this than the adorable love story of a lesbian hen couple. The story that was shared by a Twitter user managed to melt everyone's heart. Dr. Amanda Brunton, a Ph.D. scholar from the United Kingdom studying early modern epitaphs in manuscripts, shared a long Twitter thread about her hen rearing and how she came to learn about the love that had blossomed between two of her hens. Much like how humans serendipitously find their soul mate, this is a story of two lovebirds destined to find each other.



 

 

It all started when Brunton rescued a runaway chicken lost in a nearby field. "Just over a year ago, our neighbors asked me if I was missing a chicken," she wrote in a tweet about the bird they had spotted on the meadow outside her house. She was not missing a hen. "About 6 weeks later someone caught the hen and brought her to me, assuming she was mine (she was not)," she said. This hen, whom she named Domino, seemed to like being around people and so Brunton assumed she must have been someone's pet. She tried her best to find her family but was unsuccessful.



 

 

While advertisements were circulated in search of Domino's owners, she lived in the Brunton's bathroom for six weeks. Soon she realized no one was coming to claim the hen and that she would have to keep her. As per hen breeding rules, the bird has to be quarantined to make sure she is not carrying any disease. Brunton explained: "New hens have to be quarantined, preferably with a quarantine buddy. That way, if they have recovered from something infectious but remain a carrier, you'll find out when the other bird gets sick. I learned some carpentry and made her a coop, and bought her a new friend."



 

 

Enter, Michelle Obrahma. Named after the former first lady, Brunton adopted the new bantam Brahma chicken as Domino's protector. The bantam Brahma chicken grows much bigger in size and could easily scare the other birds away but Michelle was not one of them. Instead, she was easily scared by her own shadow and was also picked on by other birds. On the other hand, Domino was not pleased to be sharing her space with a stranger and losing her "heated towel rail privileges." But soon made peace with Michelle and the two birds became best buds, and Domino was the one who ended up picking on other birds and protecting Michelle.



 

 

Domino asserted her dominance with the other birds despite being half their size. Brunton stated that she "was not satisfied until she was officially head of the pecking order." This came in handy when Michelle was picked on by the others or even visiting sparrows and squirrels. "Domino now HUSTLES RIGHT IN THERE if the other birds are giving her big dumb friend any trouble," Brunton said. "They go to sleep at night separate to the other chickens, all snuggled up together, usually with one tucked under the other's wing." She also noticed how when she would bring treats for her birds and Michelle would be too timid to get some for herself, Domino would grab some, run over to Michelle, and feed it to her. "They then both cluck around together happily with their little romantic dinner away from the others," Brunton wrote.

"I mentioned this to the breeder that I bought Michelle from recently, and she says she's only ever seen this behavior as something roosters do for their favorite hen," she explained. "So basically, I've had adorable little chicken-y lesbians in my back garden the whole time and I DIDN'T REALISE." This heartwarming story brought a smile to a lot of people's faces in the midst of trying times of the pandemic. 



 

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