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This little kid giving up on shoveling snow within 5 seconds is so relatable

He loses balance like he has lost all will and falls forward and plops down on the snow.

This little kid giving up on shoveling snow within 5 seconds is so relatable
Cover Image Source: Facebook / Samantha Burke-Balsom

Winters are probably one of the most festive and loveliest times of the year but it does call in for some extra work—shoveling snow. We all love the feeling of some hot cocoa on a chilly morning whilst enjoying the snow as it envelopes the roof of your house, including your driveway. But once you're summoned to shovel it all out, it is the most annoying chore ever. For some, the dread they feel during the activity is evident in their actions, like that of 14-month-old, Rory. In a viral video that is most relatable to all, Rory, wearing his little hat, can be seen helping his dad shovel some of the snow from the driveway after the storm. However, within seconds he seems to lose all his will. In an adorable scene, little Rory loses balance while shoveling before kneeling over forward and plopping down on the pom-pom of his winter hat.



 

 

Rory stays in that position until his dad picks him up and puts him back in motion. The video was originally posted on January 7 on Facebook by Rory's mom, Samantha Burke Balsom. Ever since the video has been viewed more than 6 million times on Facebook alone with over 30K comments. The caption read, "Snow shoveling, the struggle is real. Our 14-month-old Rory helping his dad shovel after a snowfall in Clarenville, Newfoundland."



 

 

The video was also posted on Reddit which garnered over 6.0K upvotes with over 79 comments. "The way the kid's father picks them up again is sooo cute", commented u/powerposepenguin. "Best thing are babies in winter clothes. they can't really move much, can't turn, sit, and in winter clothes they are like a stuffed animal. If you pick them up or carry them, which makes it kind of fun", wrote u/Chrysheigh

While we're all sighing with Rory over the shovel trouble, nine-year-old Carter Trozzolo made the news when a CTV News camera crew stopped him for an interview while he was shoveling snow in the neighborhood. The third grader was assigned a boring task after a massive snowstorm dumped almost 12 inches of snow in Toronto. Carter did not hold back from expressing his thoughts and emotions in front of the camera. "Tiring," he told the crew, before letting out a dramatically heavy sigh. "I really wish I was in school right now." He continued, "For my neighbors, friends, probably people I even don't know," before letting out another sigh."I'm tired." The video was posted on Twitter and has amassed over 3.3 million views.



 

 

"We must never forget that Carter Trozzolo is the voice of our generation", commented @temurdur. "It's snow day in Ontario tomorrow. Someone check on Carter Trozzolo please", wrote @UbakaOgbogu. "Carter Trozzolo - Not the hero we deserved, but the hero we needed", said @philipp. "Good Morning to Carter Trozzolo and no one else", remarked, @DDisBORED. Carter also got a shout-out from the official Twitter account of the US-based Canadian Armed Forces. "Canada is so Canada sometimes that a day off school means you shovel for your neighbors, friends, and probably people you don't even know," they wrote on Twitter. "See Carter Trozzolo. Be like Carter Trozzolo." 



 

 

When school was canceled once more the subsequent day, CTV News returned for a follow-up interview with the worldwide acclaimed 9-year-old snow-shoveler, who said that he was "still exhausted." Carter added, "I'm tired. I am always tired." Cater's mom, Rachel DiSaia, spoke to the reporters and shared that she understands why the video has been so popular. "A lot of us can relate to that amount of exhaustion with everything right now," she said. "I think he captured the emotions of many people."

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