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Swimmers constantly get lost while diving into mysterious 'Blue Hole' due to this strange reason

The primary reason why deep sea divers struggle to explore the daring depths of the mysterious 'Blue Hole' in the Red Sea.

Swimmers constantly get lost while diving into mysterious 'Blue Hole' due to this strange reason
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Mael BALLAND

Deep sea diving has been one sport that has captivated thrill-seekers for a long time. These divers jump into unexplored parts of the ocean, hoping to make interesting discoveries and explore the depths. However, the sport should be done with a lot of caution as there is an infamous diving spot called the "Blue Hole," which has risked many divers' lives over the years, as reported by Lad Bible. The diving spot is approximately 120 meters deep and has also gotten the nickname the "diver's cemetery." Many divers have boldly tried to try and conquer this spot, but certain conditions there prevent them from succeeding. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

The primary reason why divers cannot go into the sinkhole is because of a phenomenon called nitrogen narcosis. This is something that can affect a diver once they try and go beyond 30 meters in a water body. Those who are affected by the condition end up breathing gases at high pressure, which severely affects their mind and body, as per The Guardian. Individuals who have gone into the Blue Hole have described seeing a light emerging at the bottom, believing that it was the surface, and swam to it. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Movoyagee
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Movoyagee

Dr. James Caruso, chief medical examiner for Denver, Colorado, who also happens to be a diver himself, said that divers experience something called "the martini effect," wherein the conditions grow stronger as the diver goes deeper. This is similar to the physical and mental impairment when a person drinks large quantities of alcohol. At a certain depth, the narcosis becomes so severe that divers end up blacking out. The divers who normally make very calculated decisions begin to make mistakes and compromise their chances of survival. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mael BALLAND
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mael BALLAND

What makes the phenomenon even more scary is that divers have to remain alert to be able to identify that they are suffering from nitrogen narcosis. An attempt to explore the Blue Hole also means that divers have to contend with "oxygen toxicity", which begins to show up at a depth of 57 meters. This takes place at "the arch," which is described as a 26-metre-long tunnel that connects the Blue Hole to the Red Sea. Oxygen toxicity causes divers to get tunnel vision and even suffer from seizures, which can result in drowning. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tirachard Kumtanom
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tirachard Kumtanom

Tarek Omar, a 53-year-old diver from Dahab, Egypt, is one of the few people who have successfully made it back alive from the Blue Hole. Omar has been doing many dives into the notorious area since 1992 after he got to know about a curse purportedly cast upon the site after a woman, unwilling to partake in an arranged marriage, tragically drowned within its depths. He rose to fame after he managed to recover the bodies of Conor O'Regan and Martin Gara from the Blue Hole in 1997. Both were divers who had lost their lives in the treacherous diving spot.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mael BALLAND
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mael BALLAND

Omar also holds the depth record for going down an astounding 209 meters into the Blue Hole, as reported by Spiegel International and is one of the few people who has extensively surveyed the sinkhole. Because of the dangers that lurk within the depths, more safety regulations are being put in place to prevent additional loss of life. Unqualified divers are officially not allowed to enter the Blue Hole at all. There are a few single-tank scuba divers who take a small trip under the arch, but even those numbers are taking a hit. In the coming years, it remains to be seen how many people will dare to enter the dangerous depths of the Blue Hole.

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