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Satirical oil company ad rings truer than ever as the Earth faces record temperature rise

A viral ad of a fictional oil company painted an eerily accurate picture of our planet's current situation as the Earth faces record high temperatures because of human actions.

Satirical oil company ad rings truer than ever as the Earth faces record temperature rise
Cover Image Source: Twitter/@SeanBurkeShow

Big corporations often tend to wrap up their problematic and unethical practices in a warm and fuzzy blanket of performative measures for the sake of their public image. Even when they actively follow practices that harm this planet we all call home, they put just great effort into hiding or minimizing the impact of their actions in the public eye for fear of it negatively impacting them financially.

Therefore, the honesty shown by comedian Sean Burke in a satirical ad for an oil company is quite refreshing. In the ad, he directly addresses the audience as a CEO of a fictional oil company and informs them that he is exploiting the environment even if it harms civilians.

Representative Image Source: Pexels/Photo by Juan J. Morales-Trejo
Representative Image Source: Pexels/Photo by Juan J. Morales-Trejo

The advertisement starts with Burke planting a tree, which he calls "doing our part." He compares the act to kissing someone on the forehead while choking them to death. In an excited tone, he explains their company's marketing strategy, which dominantly features green energy but, as a corporation, their investments do not reflect it. The campaign also clarifies that the stock footage of renewable energy resources does not have any real meaning at the end of the day. In his own words, it is like putting "con" back in "conscience."

The stand-up sketch comedian showcases a blatant disregard for nature throughout the campaign, implying a promise for investment in "carbon capture technology." The casual attitude that he has over these investments is clear by the comparison to fantasy elements like genies and wish lamps. The video ends with the message "We will be okay," the catch being that the "we" in this situation are the big corporate CEOs, and not civilians who will continue to suffer the impacts of climate change.



 



 

This satirical advertisement has now gone viral again because of the recent reports that Earth has hit the highest temperatures. BBC Breakfast reported that Europe's highest temperature was reported in Southern Spain. Places like Andujar and Sicily recorded temperatures that were more than 43°C. Statista also called the week from July 1 to July 7 the hottest week in history.

Thailand (45.4°C), Vietnam (44.2°C) and Laos (43.5°C) all had their heat records broken. This phenomenon has been a result of constant damage that has occurred due to human action. The most shocking thing is even though the impact affects everyone more or less equally, the profits generated have not been distributed equally amongst everyone.

It is evident that a particular social class has benefited more from the whole exploitation of the planet in comparison to others, as explained in the advertisement. While a portion of humanity continued to prosper, another portion did not see much improvement. As reported by Oxfam, the richest 1% in the world garner almost 2 times the wealth present with the rest of the world altogether. This urge to have more wealth has not subsided even in such critical situations, as oil corporations continue to register record profits and seek to expand their fossil fuel production, reports Guardian.



 



 

These developments have made the satirical sketch put forward by @SeanBurkeShow more ironic. The comment section was in agreement. @DILLIGAS141 brought to attention recent developments in the corporation world by writing, "The best one recently was Exxon buying Denbury. They are experts in ‘carbon capture’ - they pump co2 into wells to extract more oil."

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