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6-year-old fan who defied odds to survive gets a bedroom makeover in the colors of his favorite team

The Make-A-Wish charity and street art company MurWall came together to revamp his bedroom to surprise Oscar and his family.

6-year-old fan who defied odds to survive gets a bedroom makeover in the colors of his favorite team
Cover Image Source: Instagram / MurWalls

An avid 6-year-old Lincoln City fan who beat the odds got a surprise bedroom makeover as a tribute to his favorite team. Oscar Ottewell's parents were told he wouldn't live due to brain damage, but now, six years later, his love of the Imps keeps him going, according to the BBC. The Make-A-Wish charity and street art company MurWall came together to revamp his bedroom to surprise Oscar and his family. In addition to attending some away games, Oscar enjoys family trips to Wembley, where he had the opportunity to score a goal on the team's pitch at halftime. His heartwarming reaction to his new bedroom is now making the rounds on the internet. 



 

 

As per Lincolnite, Oscar’s dad Ashley Ottewell told BBC Look North: "Oscar’s first game was when his sister was a mascot against Grimsby when we were in the National League, and since then he’s been a season ticket holder, so we’re there singing and clapping and cheering on Lincoln City." Lincoln City’s journey up the league has followed Oscar’s journey as well. When Oscar was born, he suffered severe brain damage and had to be resuscitated before being placed in the special care baby unit at Lincoln County Hospital. After a couple of seizures, he was taken to a hospital in Nottingham. His parents were heartbroken when they learned Oscar would not survive without the ventilator, reports Lincolnshire Live. “We were told even if Oscar did make it past 30 minutes he would have no quality of life,” said Ashely. 



 

 

After showing some improvements, Oscar began to struggle again. His parents noticed he was having erratic movements and he was transferred to Sheffield after being diagnosed with West syndrome, a rare condition of an epileptic seizure. His parents were devastated and once again prepared to say goodbye to Oscar. "We genuinely thought it was the start of him [Oscar] not being with us," Ashley said. "You feel empty. You want to try everything you can do, and everything we had done, we had to battle for." However, three years later, brave Oscar defied all the odds and has the brightest smile that "could light up a room" and his parents are the happiest.

"Oscar is a happy, cheeky, gorgeous three-year-old, and although he can’t sit, walk, talk, eat, or do any other things a neurotypical three-year-old can do, he knows who he knows, makes his views known, and has a strong personality." Oscar now attends St. Francis School in Lincoln, where he's having the time of his life and according to his father, he has a great sense of humor. When an MRI scan showed he wouldn’t survive, Oscar's uncle, Ryan, asked Imps boss Danny Cowley about the possibility of getting a signed match for Oscar. The city manager and the club also arranged for the Lincoln fan to score a goal at Sincil Bank.



 

 

Oscar scored a goal at halftime of the Everton Cup match, attached to a brace with his father's legs. His family was in tears. "He squealed, and he was smiling. I was happy I didn’t slip because it was windy and raining." "He did amazing," said his dad, who is also an Imp fan. "It is something I will remember forever, and I am sure he will know he has done it." It was something for all the family. A lot of them were there behind the goal. His grandma was in tears. "I am so appreciative of the club. It is amazing what they have done."

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