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Woman shares how to deal with getting rejected for a dream job in 4 easy steps

Learn how to deal with job rejection while realizing your dream career through a renowned influencer's insightful four-step guide.

Woman shares how to deal with getting rejected for a dream job in 4 easy steps
Cover Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

Rejection is not something that most people deal with easily. It is especially true when it comes to almost getting one's dream job, only to be rejected after a few rounds. But, we have to learn to deal with such situations and LinkedIn creator Erin McGoff is here to help individuals cope with being rejected from their dream job with her recent video where she gives out four methods to deal with job rejection. The woman happens to be an award-winning film director based in New York. The post has gained 137 likes on the platform so far.

Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff Screenshot
Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

 

She begins the video by saying, "Ok, here's what you need to do if you get rejected from a job you really really wanted." The first suggestion is funny yet necessary, as she insists that individuals throw themselves a huge pity party. She goes into the details of the party by saying that one would need to adorn sweatpants, order their favorite food, put on some sad music and just process the whole thing through the night. 

Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff Screenshot
Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

 

Her second piece of advice is very useful in dealing with a job rejection. McGoff suggests that getting rejected from one's dream job might have nothing to do with the person. She says, "They could've hired internally! They could have hired the CEO's nephew!" In some cases, the organization might have decided to eliminate the position. She then moves on to tell her viewers to view it as the company's loss if they were not hired.

Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff Screenshot
Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

 

She hilariously whispers that some organizations were not very good at the hiring process. McGoff elaborates how if a job was a person's dream job and they let the company know about that, then there was very little reason for them not to bring them on board. In many cases, even after getting rejected for a job, a candidate would have been an ideal fit for the role and got rejected due to some other reason.

Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff Screenshot
Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

 

Her final tip is something new as she tells her viewers to respond to the rejection email. She says, "What!? You don't respond to rejection emails? That is, like, literally my favorite pastime." According to her, responding to rejection emails showcases a person's professionalism and confidence. She describes the act to be a "power move." More importantly, it makes the company notice people, which may ensure future employment opportunities at the same establishment. 

Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff Screenshot
Image Source: LinkedIn | Erin McGoff

 

Image Source: LinkedIn | Marissa Chabria Heilbron
Image Source: LinkedIn | Marissa Chabria Heilbron

 

Image Source: LinkedIn | Dunja Younts
Image Source: LinkedIn | Dunja Younts

 

McGoff puts forth a hypothetical scenario where the person they initially hired does not work out and they begin looking again. Or, the position opens up again in a month. Replying to rejection emails can be seen as a networking opportunity that allows job seekers to stay in touch with the companies they want. She then suggests that even after being rejected, candidates should maintain a professional attitude and connect with companies on LinkedIn. She concludes by saying, "I know it's a sucky feeling, but I promise it's all going to work out in the end." People on the networking site found the suggestions useful and expressed their support in the comment section.



 

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