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Woman 'proves' that 2, 3 and 4-year-olds mimic the ages 12, 13 and 14 and parents couldn't agree more

Teenagers and their parents relate to these comparisons, acknowledging the accuracy while finding it amusing and insightful.

Woman 'proves' that 2, 3 and 4-year-olds mimic the ages 12, 13 and 14 and parents couldn't agree more
Cover Image Source: TikTok | @theconsideratemama

Every stage of parenting presents its own set of challenges. You think your child will never learn to tie their shoelaces and then you catch your 14-year-old trying to drive the car around at 3 a.m. 'Terrible twos' and 'threenagers' can get you pulling your hair and to even imagine those years will be repeated, is a nightmare. However, conscious and present parenting, regardless of age, can make all the difference, as suggested by this parenting coach.

Rachael Rogers—who goes by @theconsideratemomma on TikTok— drew parallels between the ages of two, three, and four and the preteen and teen years of 12, 13 and 14. Her points contain some startling similarities.

Image Source: TikTok |  @theconsideratemama
Image Source: TikTok | @theconsideratemama

"Did you know that the ages of 12, 13 and 14 years old mimic the ages of two, three and four very closely?" she says in the video. She explains how two-year-olds and 12-year-olds have far more in common than most parents realize. "Two-year-olds — they love to say 'no' or talk back. They push the boundaries a lot. They're super sneaky and they're getting into things that they shouldn't be getting into," she explains. "12-year-old — same, same and same."

While comparing three and 13-year-olds, she says, "Three-year-olds — they have an insatiable desire for freedom and independence. They think they can do anything on their own, the fastest and most drastic mood shifts of any other humans on the planet. 13-year-olds — same, same, and same."

Image Source: TikTok |  @theconsideratemama
Image Source: TikTok | @theconsideratemama

Lastly, she adds, "Four-year-olds — they don't think they need you anymore. They are fully convinced that they could move out right then and there and be totally fine taking care of themselves. They think they know everything there is to know about everything. The sky is not blue. The grass is not green. You're an idiot, mom or dad. 14-year-olds — same, same and same."

 

Rogers' theory was supported by teenagers and their parents alike. "I feel attacked as a 14y old bc I'm moving out in a year," wrote @findus_fimpar. "I found this funny and accurate but also felt a little strange being compared to a toddler, lmao," commented @freakish_devil_. "I actually did try and move out at 4. I packed a lunch pack with bananas and cold hot dogs and took off. I was convinced I could go live in a barn with animals and do just fine. At least I had the foresight to bring food," shared @ur_nabor.

Image Source: TikTok
Image Source: TikTok

Experienced parents on the internet couldn't agree less and new parents were startled by this warning. "My almost-four-year-old daughter has started telling me, 'I know everything.' The other day she told me she knew everything about boats. When I asked her what she knew so I could learn, she said, 'Sometimes they are in the water and sometimes behind a car.' So there you have it. You can thank me later for sharing all there is to know about boats," shared @maya_d. "I have a 12-year-old and can confirm this is true!! Not taking it personally is so hard and trying to understand what they’re trying to communicate is a lot of what they need," suggested @karelyacker.

Watch the full video here:


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Rachael Rogers (@theconsideratemomma)


 

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