NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Woman gives away late father's trust fund and wealth to people who were kind to him

A daughter who is in charge of her late father's assets decided to distribute his wealth on the basis of how well he was treated by people around him.

Woman gives away late father's trust fund and wealth to people who were kind to him
Cover Image Source: (L) Pexels | Karolina Grabowska; (R) Reddit | u/gulleyowl

People grow lonelier with their age most of the time. Either their closest friends end up passing away due to old age or they are simply confined to their homes for the last few days of their long life. During these periods, there are very few young folks who take some time to think about the elderly and give them company. Reddit user u/gulleyowl shares one such story about her father when he was treated differently by different people in his last few years. And the daughter has something special in store for all those fellows.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

The post on Reddit was titled: "The checks are in the mail." The post detailed at the beginning that the woman's father was increasingly impaired by strokes but his mind was still sharp and he used to live alone. However, gradually things got a lot more difficult for him and his daughter was his only primary support. "To my family - young and old - I constantly reminded them how much letters, cards, thank you notes and visits mattered to him. Everyone got a gift, usually money, from him for every occasion. He lived in a beach resort, so it wasn't hard visiting him," the post started.

"He left his money in a trust and I am in charge of the assets. My father saved every note, collected all the letters, and wrote about every visit in his journal. Last week I sat down and tallied it all up. Today, I am mailing checks to all the grandchildren and great-grandchildren: $1,000 for every note, $2,000 for every visit, and $3,000 per day for anyone who took him on an outing overnight," the woman continued.

Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska
Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska

She admitted that it was indeed a petty move but it was necessary. "The two people who should get nothing under my formula are going to get $500 each just so they know they were not overlooked. A 14-year-old great-niece is getting over $100K because she rode her bike over every week and did his yard etc. The feathers will be flying when the envelopes are opened," the post concluded. The netizens applauded her decision and some even provided a bunch of advice over the comments.

Image Source: Reddit | u/jai151
Image Source: Reddit | u/jai151

 

Image Source: Reddit | u/Coygon
Image Source: Reddit | u/Coygon

u/Zoreb1 suggested: "Also discuss your distribution method to make sure you can't be sued. I take it that he's deceased but don't know if he had a will or what the terms of the trust are. I have a friend who is a recipient of a trust - it paid out until the third generation and then dissolved (meaning the remaining assets were divided among the surviving beneficiaries). Someone sued but all that did was delay the final distribution."

u/No-Mango8923 commented: "Reminds me of my husband's gramps. He was the only one of all the grandkids who visited him weekly when he moved into an old people's place. (Husband's mum did as well, but by then Gramps thought she was the meals-on-wheels lady - dementia had taken hold). Hubby was 18 at the time Gramps was moved. But he still brought round his weekend newspaper for him. Gramps used to call my husband by his uncle's name (Gramps's youngest son), but Gramps knew it was his grandson even if he got the name wrong."

Image Source: Reddit | u/AHRA1225
Image Source: Reddit | u/AHRA1225

u/1bethinss added: "Please put the $100k in a trust for the great-niece. She may never see a penny of it otherwise. It’s got to be protected." Aging does make people vulnerable and they deserve all our love and attention but people often overlook or abandon them, considering these veterans a burden.  According to a report from Pew Research Center, nearly a third of people aged 65-74 live alone; the number is more than twice as high for those 85 and above. The report also found that less than 5% of both groups live in assisted living facilities by the end of their lifetime.

More Stories on Scoop