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Woman shares moving conversations with her grandmother before she seeks a medically-assisted death

Ali Tate Cutler, a Texas-based model, explained that her grandma has chosen to seek a medically-assisted death after being diagnosed with terminal cancer.

Woman shares moving conversations with her grandmother before she seeks a medically-assisted death
Cover Image Source: TikTok / @alitatecutler

A Victoria's Secret model is sharing how she supports her terminally ill grandmother during her last days after the 85-year-old decided to opt for a medically-assisted death. In a moving TikTok series, Ali Tate Cutler, a Texas-based model, explains that her grandma, Bubbie, who lives in Canada, has chosen to seek euthanasia after being diagnosed with terminal cancer.

"My grandmother decided 30 years ago that if her death would be drawn out and painful, that she was mentally and spiritually committed to medical assistance in dying," Tate, 32, told TODAY. In Canada, euthanasia (medically-assisted death) is legal, and Tate has not disclosed her grandmas' name and age to protect her privacy. However, she revealed that Bubbie is in her "mid-80s."

Image Source: TikTok / @alitatecutler
Image Source: TikTok / @alitatecutler

In a video posted on May 19, Tate asked Bubbie, "What are your thoughts as you move closer to the date?" She answered that it is like the "light at the end of the tunnel." Bubbie explained that she would make an appointment one day and receive an injection that put her to sleep. "It's painless," said Bubbie, adding that she prefers to do it at a hospital rather than at home.

"I came in quietly, I'd like to go out quietly," she said, adding, "I'm looking forward to just putting it in, to being dependent, no control. When I'll be ready, I'll know. I do believe [her late husband] is there saying, 'It's about time.' And I'll say, 'Hi... I'm here.' That's it."



 

Speaking to The Independent, Tate mentioned that her grandmother has always felt “strongly” for euthanasia and that she “knew that she kind of wanted to exit the world in this way.” She added, “She just did not want to suffer in her final moments.” Tate explained that even with chemotherapy treatment, Bubbie would only have six months left to live.

“So she decided that she wanted to go out on her terms,” she said. Tate said that her family has been “incredibly supportive” of her grandmother’s wish, which Bubbie described as “body sovereignty and autonomy.” Tate said, “We come into the world alone, we leave it alone. It’s a personal decision.”

However, Tate is aware of how “hard” it has been to spend time with her grandmother, knowing it will be the last time with each other. She said she is trying to “stay positive” for her Bubbie. “These last four days have been so hard. I’m trying to stay positive for my Bubbie, but I can’t handle that I’m about to say goodbye forever at the airport tomorrow,” Tate wrote as she cried in a TikTok video. In the caption of the emotional video, she added: “Being able to cry with her has been a blessing. But it’s the finality of death that is repeating on a loop in my mind.”



 

Bubbie also shared some "life advice" to young people, saying, "Laugh, have fun, enjoy your loved ones as much as you can. Tell them you love them. Share, be open, and be honest. Talk, just talk. If you have love in your life, hold onto it because it's so precious. Just honor love. Express it, live it."

Tate frequently uses her platform to discuss issues such as mental health and self-love and acknowledges that these topics are not “talked about enough.” "I have no regrets about sharing this journey," she said. "I wanted to have a conversation and a showing of death because it's so taboo in the West. You can see how triggered some people are; it's triggering because most haven't integrated the fact that they too, are going to die, but those who are dying can teach the next generation."

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