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Trump may not go quietly if he loses the election. He says 'he'll have to see.'

Trump may not go quietly if he loses the election. He says 'he'll have to see.'

The United States President said in an interview on Fox News Sunday that he would have a tough time accepting the results of a "rigged" election.

American citizens have for a while now suspected that United States President Donald Trump may not respect the outcomes of the upcoming presidential election. On an episode of Fox News Sunday last weekend, their concerns were strengthened. When host Chris Wallace asked Trump if he would accept the results of the election if he loses to Democratic candidate Joe Biden, he responded, "I have to see," Axios.com reports. When asked why he would hesitate to concede the White House, he claimed he had concerns about mail-in voting, a process the president has been critical of even during the Democratic Primaries.

 



 

 

The Fox News anchor pressed Trump to "give a direct answer" to his question. He, therefore, said in response, "I have to see. Look, you—I have to see. No, I’m not going to just say ‘yes.’ I’m not going to say no and I didn’t last time either." Of course, the last time, he was not the incumbent candidate (he said in a 2016 interview with Wallace, "I will tell you at the time, I’ll keep you in suspense"). The question was prompted by a conversation about whether the president was "a good loser" or not. To this, he said flat out that he was not a good loser and argued that "mail-in voting is going to rig the election."

 



 

 

Unfortunately, Trump's concerns about mail-in voting are largely unsubstantiated. He has in the past claimed that the process is more susceptible to voter fraud, which is simply not true. Mail-in voting is expected, in actuality, to increase voter turnout especially at a time when the country is battling with a public health crisis. Further to this, there are few signs to prove that mail-in voting has a "partisan effect"; neither the Republican Party nor the Democratic Party is likely to see any extra "benefits" from the process. Despite mounting evidence that the president could be wrong about his stance, he refuses to acknowledge he may be wrong.

 



 

That is the crux of why his statements with Wallace on Fox News Sunday matter. As Trump continues to perpetuate the idea that the Democrats want to keep the country closed not as a means to protect its citizens from a life-threatening disease but in order to negatively impact his campaign—"The Democrats are purposely keeping their schools closed, keeping their states closed," he stated. "We’re not allowed to have rallies in these Democrat-run states."—there are some worries that the transition of power may not be easy or simple. At present, Democratic contender Biden is leading in the polls. The latest national poll, CNBC reports, shows Biden leads Trump by eight percent.

 



 

The president said of these polls, "First of all, I’m not losing because those are fake polls. They were fake in 2016 and now they’re even more fake." He seems unable to accept facts and data, which could prove detrimental to American democracy as we know it. Trump has already issued several executive orders that were in violation of democratic protocol. There is, in the minds of some political pundits, no doubt that he would try to hold on to his power by any methods necessary—even if that means altering the way our nation's democracy functions.

 



 

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