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Touching moment Tony Bennett, who has Alzheimer's, remembers song he's been singing for 50 years

Music has been proved as a great therapy to reawaken the memory loss faced by people with Alzheimer's.

Touching moment Tony Bennett, who has Alzheimer's, remembers song he's been singing for 50 years
Cover Image Source: YouTube | MTV UK

Editor's note: This article was originally published on November 11, 2022. It has since been updated.

Alzheimer's disease poses a great many challenges for the people who have been diagnosed with it as well as everyone around them. According to Mayoclinic, it causes a continuous decline in thinking, memory, behavioral and social skills and can be extremely difficult to live with. Tony Bennett, the legendary singer, has been battling with this condition for almost six years and is still managing to inspire people with his music.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 08: Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett prior to the Gala Concert in aid of WellChild at Royal Albert Hall on June 8, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Alan Davidson - WPA Pool / Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 08: Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett prior to the Gala Concert in aid of WellChild at Royal Albert Hall on June 8, 2015, in London, England. (Photo by Alan Davidson - WPA Pool / Getty Images)

 

Image Source: Reddit
Image Source: Reddit

 

A heartwarming moment between Bennett and his long-time friend Lady Gaga has been admired by people on the internet. A video was posted by u/TerrySharpHY on Reddit that states that Bennett has a hard time remembering names, however, when Lady Gaga asked him to perform an age-old song something incredible happened. She says to him that nobody in the world can sing it better and Bennett instantly recalls the lyrics of this song he has been performing for over 50 years and sings it in an absolutely beautiful manner on stage.

Image Source: Reddit
Image Source: Reddit

 

His song moved everyone in the audience and even Gaga had tears in her eyes by the end of it. He even glances at his wife sitting in the audience as he continues to sing. His fans were brought to tears considering that even after battling a painful neurological condition, Bennett's love for music surpasses every difficulty and struggle he faces every day. One Reddit user noted, "This was a beautiful moment. I’m sure his wife and family will always cherish it. Thank you to Lady Gaga for making this magic happen." Another said, "I remember when my Grandpa was alive he couldn't remember anyone's name. But he never forgot the rhythm Of the music he Used to listen to. He would tap his fingers and sing acapella songs." 

Image Source: Reddit
Image Source: Reddit

 

Music and Alzheimer's disease indeed have a bittersweet connection because as seen in many patients, they are able to recall and remember musical tunes even while suffering degenerative memory loss. According to Alzheimer's Association, a person with even late-stage Alzheimer's can remember the tunes and music that was part of their childhood. Several people in Reddit comments recognized this with one writing, "I don't know the science behind it, but music helped with Alzheimer patients immensely. Especially in aggressive and ones with extreme anxiety. I've known patients that have forgotten their names but remember Twinkle Twinkle Little star."

 



 

Another added, "I always remember singing 'You are my Sunshine' with my Mom when she had Alzheimer's and at one point she turned to me and asked "Why do I know this?". It even surprised her." In another instance of music playing a major role in the lives of people with Alzheimer's, in Mexico City Mariachi which is a staple of Mexican Culture is being used to treat the memory loss caused by the condition, per ABC News. According to the Mexican Alzheimer's Center, music might assist people with dementia to relive their memories. It's even inspired patients to sing and dance to their favorite music.

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