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This hilarious evidence of kids copying homework from each other is cracking everyone up

The progression of the copied answer from being correct to absolutely making sense is amusing on the internet.

This hilarious evidence of kids copying homework from each other is cracking everyone up
Cover Image Source: Reddit | u/ReignofKindo25

As much as it's a great deal of responsibility, being a teacher often comes with the perks of experiencing some funny instances with students. Especially while scoring her tests or homework, teachers often come across some of the most rib-tickling answers. Recently, a teacher witnessed one such amusing answer which made her concerned at first only to find out later that it was copied. Going by u/ReignofKindo25 on Reddit, the teacher shared a video revealing the answers of three different students that indicated how the kids had miserably failed while trying to copy each other's chemistry homework.

Image Source: Reddit | u/ReignofKindo25
Image Source: Reddit | u/ReignofKindo25

It became perplexing when the chemistry teacher noticed a weird answer to the question, "What causes the trend in acidic/basic oxides?" One of her students answered the question with, "Couldn't have existed," and this bothered her. "I was worried till I found the telephone game these kids were playing when copying their homework," the teacher mentioned in the post. As shown in the video, the answer written by one of the kids underwent a few stages of metamorphosis before it eventually became, "Couldn't have existed." The first kid who scored 98% answered, "Covalent bonds are acidic." The second kid who copied this answer understood it as "Covalent bonds are existed."

Image Source: Reddit | u/ReignofKindo25
Image Source: Reddit | u/ReignofKindo25

Unfortunately, the third kid had to copy the already flawed answer of the second one whose handwriting seemed a bit hard to make out. So, in the third homework, "Covalent bonds are acidic," became "Couldn't have existed." This hilarious mishap left the internet in stitches as the kids' attempt to copy turned out to be an epic fail case of the "telephone game." In one of the comments, the teacher spoke about students copying their homework saying, "It’s so prevalent now they told us in teacher training this year to allow it during homework."

The teacher who preferred to be called Ms. Storey was genuinely worried while seeing the, "Couldn't have existed," response in the homework. "I was going to see if he was OK the next day at school. But then I saw the other papers," she told Newsweek. "They always copy. It was more upsetting in the beginning, as this was my first year teaching. By the time I graded those papers, I expected to see copying," the teacher added. People were so amused by this post that they started their "telephone game," in the comments. 

Image Source: Reddit | u/Do-not-respond
Image Source: Reddit | u/Do-not-respond
Image Source: Reddit | u/JazzedSympathy
Image Source: Reddit | u/JazzedSympathy

"How did they manage that? Like they must’ve been playing the telephone game to copy each other's work," quipped u/SloppySouvlaki. "When I taught high school English, kids would take out their phones and google the first question. If they could find the answers, they'd do the work. If not, not. Teachers would admit to each other how bad cheating/lack of engagement was, but the admin came from counseling and just lectured us about being student-centered and flexible when it came to how students met the learning targets," said u/quietconflictavoider. "Why not allow it (copying)? That's the whole point of the tests. Don't encourage it, but I wouldn't bother trying to stop it. It's an extra fight," remarked u/ProtoJazz.

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