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Teen rejected by top colleges lands job at Google right after graduating from high school

This guy did not let numerous rejections dampen his spirits and continued to fight toward his goals which he ultimately achieved.

Teen rejected by top colleges lands job at Google right after graduating from high school
Cover Image Source: YouTube | ABC 7 News Bay Area

The real winners do not give up until they reach their goals and they certainly do not get disheartened after facing rejections on the way to their destination. However, the demands in educational sectors are so absurd that even the cream of the crop students are getting their dreams crushed. However, this 18-year-old boy refused to give up despite getting rejected by over a dozen colleges.



 

A Gunn High School graduate named Stanley Zhong from Palo Alto, California had a 3.97 unweighted and 4.42 weighted GPA and had a score of 1590 out of 1600 on the SATs, per KABC-TV. Zhong applied to 18 colleges and all he got was disappointment in return. "Some of them were certainly expected," Stanley told the outlet, mentioning that he was looking forward to getting a green signal from MIT and Stanford, to say the least. He thought he had a good chance at getting into state schools like UC Davis and the California Polytechnic State University as well.

However, by the end of his college-hunting struggle, he was admitted to the University of Maryland and the University of Texas at Austin among others. He was also focused on finding a job right after graduating. Zhong went ahead to apply for a position of full-time software engineer at Google but he couldn't predict what was coming next for him. "I figured worst case, I would get interview experience and see what the process was like and maybe I would get lucky," Zhong told CBS News.

Image Source: The annual technology conference, also known as VivaTech, was founded in 2016 by Publicis Groupe and Groupe Les Echos and is dedicated to promoting innovation and startups. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)
Image Source: The annual technology conference, also known as VivaTech, was founded in 2016 by Publicis Groupe and Groupe Les Echos and is dedicated to promoting innovation and startups. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Zhong's hard work paid off when he got the opportunity to work at Google and that led him to put his college life on hold. He further told KABC-TV that he was "extremely frustrated by the college acceptance process." "You don't get reasons, you just get 'You're rejected,'" the 18-year-old revealed to CBS News. Zhong's father also works as a Google software engineering manager and he told KABC-TV that he hopes to launch a movement and demand transparency from the colleges during the admission process.

The teen told CBS News about his plans, mentioning how he hasn't "ruled out re-applying to college yet" but for now, he plans to work at Google at least for a year. “From there I will think about, 'Am I making good contributions and doing good work?' If that's the case, I will stay until I don't feel like I am or that I am missing out on a lot by not going to college," he concluded.



 

In another inspirational story, a 17-year-old boy named RuQuan Brown received admission offers from 24 different colleges after graduating from high school back in 2020. Brown has not only aced his way into getting admission offers from neighboring universities but also Ivy League schools such as Yale and Harvard. The young man not only has a shining academic record but also runs his own company which donates proceedings to communities that are negatively impacted by gun violence.



 

According to Black Enterprise, Brown shared how he is slowly becoming an inspiration for youths like him. In addition to holding a 3.9 GPA, he was also the student body president and a gifted athlete. Outside of academics, he runs Love1, a clothing company he uses to raise awareness about gun violence after losing teammates, friends, and family members to guns. "I started it to honor the lives of my teammate and stepdad, who were murdered a year apart," he said, per the site. "I wanted to beat gun violence to the punch so that our families don’t have to continuously fall victim to tragic losses." Brown ultimately went to study at Harvard and he continues to work towards his goals.



 

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