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Teen explains the absurd reasons why she was dress-coded for outfits at school: 'Cut too low'

Dress-coding girls in school is nothing new but these absurd reasons highlight the root cause of such rules.

Teen explains the absurd reasons why she was dress-coded for outfits at school: 'Cut too low'
Cover Image Source: TikTok | @eliseecork

Girls have a lot of rules they need to adhere to right from the moment they're born. This also extends to when they go to school and need to wear only a certain kind of clothes so as not to "distract" the boys. Elise—who goes by @eliseecork on TikTok—posted a video showing everyone the outfit she got dress-coded for at school while also explaining the reason why. All of the reasons given by her school for these seemingly decent outfits just display how the world polices women and girls' choices of expression.

Image Source: TikTok | @joleeshine
Image Source: TikTok | @eliseecork

The first video that she posted showed the outfits she was dress-coded for at school. It's fair to say that most of her outfits included a full pant and a decent-looking top, except one, which was during some event at her school where kids were allowed to wear whatever they wanted. On top of that, she was wearing Velma's outfit from Scooby Doobie Doo, which is quite literally one of the most reserved characters out there.

Image Source: TikTok | @joleeshine
Image Source: TikTok | @eliseecork

In the second video she posted, she explained what was wrong with every outfit, according to her teacher. In a knitted top and jeans outfit, the stitches of the knit were apparently too wide, even though she was wearing a thick black tank top inside. In an outfit with purple palazzos and a white v-necked top, the neck was too deep and the shirt was too sheer. Next, she was dress-coded for wearing a cropped top with high-waisted jeans, which allowed no skin to be shown. In another top she wore with red pants, the top was a problem because it had lace on it. She was dress-coded for another knitted sweater for the same reason. She wore an oversized top with buttons on top, any of which she wasn't allowed to keep open.

Image Source: TikTok | @joleeshine
Image Source: TikTok | @eliseecork

Then came the Velma outfit she wore for her school's spirit week, a week where people wore anything and everything, right from body paint to swimsuits. She got dress-coded for the length of her skirt by the same teacher who's had a problem with all these outfits. However, the office said they wouldn't write her up for dressing like she wanted for spirit week. Another top she wore with black pants too had a deep neck and was too cropped.

The next white top she wore with proper innerwear  was too sheer. When she wore the top that had lace on it with a huge jacket on top, she was dress-coded for the neck being too deep. Lastly, she was dress-coded for a top, which rose slightly up to show her back when she hunched over. Despite thanking the teacher for pointing it out, she was dress-coded for it being a cropped top, which it wasn't.

Image Source: TikTok | @joleeshine
Image Source: TikTok | @eliseecork

The comment section was as appalled and amused as Elise. @dan1elle.__ said what everyone was thinking and stated, "Nah girl, you're just being targeted. My school has a pretty strict dress code, but all of these would've been fine." Another user, @adriugh, suggested, "If they are gonna be so picky, just make uniforms. And I don't think that should be the solution like there is nothing wrong with these outfits." @winterrapunzel01 said, "Literally the reason why I would just wear a hoodie and jeans all the time at school and never got to find my true style," to which @eliseecork replied, "Lol I wasn't even technically allowed to wear hoodies." And just like us, we're sure you're also wondering why! 

Image Source: TikTok | @joleeshine
Image Source: TikTok | @opossumilk

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