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Tech company creates revolutionary earbuds to improve life of people with disabilities

In Vancouver, groundbreaking earbuds are set to revolutionize the lives of the disabled, offering transformative technology.

Tech company creates revolutionary earbuds to improve life of people with disabilities
Cover Image Source: Naqi Logix | YouTube

The way we interact with our technology can make a world of difference in their real-world usage. It also makes a huge difference for disabled people who wish to control electronic devices with more ease. Thankfully, Naqi Logix, a Vancouver-based tech company, has come up with technology that could potentially revolutionize the way humans interact with technology. According to the Vancouver Sun, the Naqi technology is essentially an invisible human-to-machine interface that utilizes gyroscopic sensors and biosensors to identify the smallest body movements.

Image Source: NAQILOGIX
Image Source: NAQILOGIX

These movements could be as small as the tilting of one's head, the blink of an eye, or even clenching one's jaw. Once it identifies these movements, it sends a signal to the corresponding electrical device. The technology can be used in virtual worlds, the metaverse and more physical tech, such as wheelchairs. What makes it even more appealing is that the technology is non-invasive and can be applied to earbuds, eyeglasses or any other kind of wearable item. There are also no messy wires, thanks to Bluetooth connectivity.



 

The invention proved to be so ground-breaking that Time Magazine declared it as one of the Best Inventions in 2023. It's also unique in the sense that it was initially thought of and patented by David Segal, an American and then brought to Canada for development by entrepreneur Mark Godsy. Miro Cerentig, Naqi's co-founder, said, "It's a true Canadian tech story, one of the rare times you see a Canadian company bringing ideas from the U.S. and building them here." Former mayor of Vancouver Sam Sullivan, a quadriplegic, was asked by Naqi to test out the custom-made set of Naqi earbuds with the device inside it.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Naqi Logix Inc (@naqilogixinc)


 

Sullivan found it quite easy to use the technology and said that it only took "seconds" to understand how it worked. He said, "Right away, I was able to turn in my wheelchair, go back and forth and do all these fine adjustments and motions. It was easy, immediate and intuitive." Sullivan also pointed out how it could be a "game-changer" for individuals of the disabled community, especially because it could replace the outdated sip-and-puff technology.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Naqi Logix Inc (@naqilogixinc)


 

As the name suggests, the sip-and-puff technology involved users having a device in their mouths, which they would have to breathe air into or suck on a straw to get working. Many members found this technology cumbersome and not easy to use. Sullivan spoke about how technology matters to disabled people: "For quality of life, all people with disabilities are dependent on technology. The better the technology, the better the quality of life." 



 

He also added how he had been looking for new technology his entire life. It was also extremely lucky for Sullivan that the device was being created and tested in Vancouver. He said, "Vancouver has been at the forefront of inclusive design and has a history of community heroes like Terry Fox and Rick Hansen. It makes sense if we could brand Vancouver as a center for innovation in tech-related to accessibility." 


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Naqi Logix Inc (@naqilogixinc)


 

While the technology can be used for people with disabilities, it also has a variety of applications in robotics, gaming and driving. Cernetig spoke about the company, saying, "We're not an earbud maker. This is a technology and software that can be licensed to whatever sector that wants to use it for whatever purpose they can find." The name Naqi is derived from the Annunaki gods, who the ancient Sumerians believed controlled everything in the universe.

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