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Swans at the Bishop Palace follow the age-old tradition of ringing a bell for a treat

Their elegant strolls and captivating presence grant them special privileges at the moat, where they gather admirers.

Swans at the Bishop Palace follow the age-old tradition of ringing a bell for a treat
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrew Patrick

The ongoing debate about the intelligence of animals is a topic that continues to captivate our attention. Whether it is a dog, a chimpanzee or even cattle, we are well aware of their wise tactics to get what they want. Animals have an intellect that sometimes goes beyond our understanding. Animals following tradition is something unusual. However, this story is an authentic blend of intellect and legacy. The post shared by Visit Wells shows how the Bishop Palace swans continue to swell and swim as they follow a legacy that is several years old by just "ringing a bell."

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Car Girl
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Car Girl

The Bishop Palace in England is no stranger to several locals and tourists. There is plenty to see but one of the stunning spaces is the wonderful wells known for their serene beauty, especially the swans. Having come from the Swan Rescue South Wales, these swans have a safe home here at the Bishop Palace waters. The snow-white swans themselves are graceful but that’s not all. They possess a unique habit and understanding of "ringing a bell" every time they want a treat. That’s right, a bell is connected to a string which is left in the water. Each time the swans need a treat, they go right over and simply pull the string causing the bell to ring. Quite a royal treatment for swans, one could say. But of course, they’re living at the Bishop Palace!


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Visit Wells (@visitwells)


 

The concept of ringing a bell for a treat at the Bishop Palace is not new. More than just an intellectual act, this goes back in history to the 1850s. The Bishop’s daughter was the one who initially started the practice of teaching swans to ring a bell at the gatehouse for a treat. What started hundreds of years ago is fervently passed down and admired even today. The Palace is also known to have names for their swans and the current popular pair that has stolen many hearts are Gabriel and Grace. Their strolls and aura earn them their privileges at the moat along with quite a few admirers.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Visit Wells (@visitwells)


 

It’s simply adorable how swans have understood the idea of ringing a bell to get treats. Not just that, they are following a legacy along with learning behavioral patterns. Who can imagine a swan passing down a tradition that is hundreds of years old to another of its kind? But that is the magnificent reality at the Bishop's Palace.

The cygnets learn not only through teaching and practice but also through observation. It is simply a natural beauty to understand how the minds of animals work and how they pick up on simple yet mesmerizing things so well. The entire concept of naming the swans, their ringing the bell and their natural grace altogether add royalty to the waters and the palace itself.


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Visit Wells (@visitwells)


 

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