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Strangers are 'bombarding ' public spaces with scarves to help the homeless fight the bitter cold

'The first year I did it, I had 147. I thought that was wonderful. This year, it's like 2,500. And I'm still getting them in,' shared Volpe.

Strangers are 'bombarding ' public spaces with scarves to help the homeless fight the bitter cold
Cover Image Source: Facebook | Scarf Bombardiers

Some people have beautiful hearts and think about other people's needs. It could be in the smallest way possible and it leaves a huge impact on people's lives and that's what Suzanne Volpe has done in all these years. For the past nine years, she has been bombarding public spaces with scarves for those who need them during the cold winter months, reports Good Morning America.



 

She came to know about the "scarf bombing" in 2014. Volpe, who is a Pittsburg resident, said, "I saw a Facebook post. One of my friends tagged me and said, 'Hey, look, somebody's doing this.' And they were putting scarves on trees. I have a friend in Connecticut who jumped on it and did it and called it a scarf bomb and I said, 'Oh, somebody should do that here.' She said, 'Well, you're somebody.' I was like, 'Well, yeah, I guess I am.' And that's how it started." She is a retiree and has been crocheting for a very long time. Volpe was so inspired by the project that she started making scarves herself and started putting them in areas around Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where she stayed earlier. The 71-year-old has also loved crocheting or knitting and has been making Afghans and scarves for her friends. "So I enjoy every bit of it. I enjoy crocheting. I enjoy getting together with people to make things and I love, love and love putting them out, especially when you see the reaction of some people. They're so appreciative," she said.



 

Volpe started the Scarf Bombardiers Facebook group in 2015 and encouraged others to join the project. She said, "The first year I did it, I had 147. I thought that was wonderful. This year, it's like 2,500. And I'm still getting them in," she told WTAE.com, "We collect scarves all year round and then we put tags on them so people know to take them." She added that the tags "tell people, 'If you're cold, take this.' And then we try and pick areas where there's a lot of foot traffic and where there might be need and we just go and tie them on the fences or poles or whatever seems appropriate. Bus shelters are really good too." Now, the group collects and drops off about 25 to 50 scarves per outing in at least a dozen public places, from bus shelters to churches around Pittsburgh. "We do it all over the city of Pittsburgh and the suburbs," Volpe said, "As a result, I've had other groups form because of some of the media coverage we've had. I have one in Blairsville... Kittanning and the Harrisburg one is still going strong."



 

The 71-year-old makes about 400 crocheted scarves each winter and countless fleece scarves. The project has begun to receive way more donations from people around the country. "All you have to do with fleece is you cut the fleece and then you just put fringes on the edges. It doesn't need to be sewed. It doesn't unravel or anything. It's ridiculously easy. Anyone can do it," she said. She added that she will be continuing the project for the foreseeable future and she recommends scarf bombing to anyone who may be interested, including young people like the local Girl Scout troop that joined Scarf Bombardiers. Ron Garrison, who stays in Wilkinsburg, speaking about Volpe, said, "She's an inspiration. I hope all people can be like her and take a page out of her book and help others. Because we all need a little help out here in the world."

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