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Second-grade student’s math question completely baffles her mother and the internet

The mom asked people on the internet to help her out and they stepped up to solve the question.

Second-grade student’s math question completely baffles her mother and the internet
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Lum3n, Reddit | u/No_Personality1984

Mathematics is a subject that might not be everyone's cup of tea. Either you are very good at it or you struggle a lot to understand even the simplest concepts in this subject. But even though maths is tough, it is necessary to have some basic knowledge about it to get through life. A mother was facing difficulties while helping her second-grade daughter solve a math question, so she took to Reddit to ask for help from strangers. 

Image Source: Reddit | u/No_Personality1984
Image Source: Reddit | u/No_Personality1984

The question is basically an extension of a previous question that can be seen in the photograph. "200 + 60 + 9 = 269," it reads. The question that follows asks readers to "stretch" their thinking by writing an addition equation. But they would have to follow a few conditions: "The equation must have a 1-, a 2- and a 3-digit addend and use all of these digits.” The mother reveals in the caption that the teacher has asked for an answer that includes the numbers and how she is not able to find a solution.

She writes, "This is probably so easy, but after an hour, I'm at my wit's end! Second grade! Please help this mama out." People who saw the post stepped up to help her. A Reddit user made an important observation about the answer to the previous question, saying, "Note that the previous question is wrong. You only have 2 hundreds, not 200 hundreds. Likewise, you have 6 tens, not 60 tens." The mother replied to the post, thanking the individual for spotting the error. u/WaycoKid1129 hilariously expressed, "I read this and got anxiety. I do not miss math class."

Image Source: Reddit | u/Winter-Alps5402
Image Source: Reddit | u/Winter-Alps5402
Image Source: Reddit | u/Zakk56711
Image Source: Reddit | u/Zakk56711

Many others provided answers, but it was u/RevolutionaryAtWork who gave the most credible response by revealing the three numbers to be "800, 60, and 2," which would satisfy all the conditions mentioned in the question. The mother replied to the comment, thanking them by saying, "Dear u/RevolutionaryAtWork, why did you make it look so easy! We were about to start WWIII over here and you just whipped it out like the obvious that it is. Thank you for saving my tired brain and also my child’s teacher from a very wordy email. You win hero of the day! Sincerely, parenting in the month of May s**ks."

The internet seems to be filled with confusing math questions. A few months back, @MarkLTighe posted a tweet containing a seemingly simple math question that eventually confused a lot of people. He wrote, "Hmm. Controversial ruling from the múinteoir here on 'How many corners does a semicircle have'." The question was - how many corners a semicircle has? The answer that the child provided was two, which the teacher marked incorrect. People were quite divided about the actual answer to the question.



 

@NIAMHBL said, "In geometry, a semicircle is a plane figure that is formed by dividing a circle into exactly two parts. A corner is a place or angle where two sides or edges meet. So the answer is yes, the semicircle has two corners where the curved semi-circumference meets the straight diameter." Another individual, @PoliticsWatch14, commented, "A semicircle, by definition, has no corners because corners are points where two or more edges meet at an angle, and the perimeter of a semicircle consists of one straight edge called the diameter and one curved edge called the arc. Therefore, the correct answer to the question would be that a semicircle has 0 corners." Although, nobody seemed to have a final concrete answer to the question.

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