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There's a scientific reason why you wake up just before your alarm goes off

A protein called PER plays a key role in this scenario because it regulates our sleep-wake cycle.

There's a scientific reason why you wake up just before your alarm goes off
Cover Image Source: Getty Images | Hirurg

Do you often wake up before the alarm goes off on essential days like an exam or an important office meeting and wonder why what happens? It turns out that there is an actual scientific reason behind it. The reason is that our body is controlled by a ball of nerves known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus, according to Arizona Daily Sun. This nucleus sits in the middle of our brains and controls our body temperature, blood pressure, and most importantly, our sense of time. It also decides when you feel awake and you feel extremely sleepy. So now you know whom to blame for waking up late on certain days.

Moreover, our body clock responds to routine, becoming more efficient each morning. A protein called PER plays a key role in this scenario because it regulates our sleep-wake cycle. Having low levels of this protein leads to low blood pressure which makes you groggier and ready for bed. Scientists believe that if you stick to a sleep schedule, the body will learn to adapt and increase levels of PER just before the alarm goes off. It is said that the protein levels will increase which will happen around an hour before the alarm is due to go off, as we also release stress hormones. 



 

 

If you haven't woken up before the alarm, it can lead to bit of a shock and can cause stress to your body. So to basically avoid that, PER is released sometime before the alarm goes off. According to a survey, 3 in 10 adults in the United States face daytime fatigue and nighttime sleep disturbances. It is a study published in JAMA Network Open. The survey included a nationally representative sample of more than 9000 adults aged 20 years or older. The research states that many adults catch up on their sleep on off days which means they sleep in later than on workdays. Also, more than 30% of people have chronic sleep debt which is the difference between sleep duration on days off compared to working days. Mainly due to sleeping later on weekend nights. It also states that there is a high percentage of adults who have chronic sleep deprivation. 



 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic poor sleep could lead to risk factors such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and depression.



 

 

Researchers suggest a 4-7-8 breathing method for people who have trouble falling asleep. In this technique, the person is supposed to inhale through the nose for a count of four, hold the breath at the top of the inhale for a count of seven and exhale through pursed lips for a count of eight. The researchers claim that this breathing method engages the diaphragm and improves breathing efficacy and even posture. It also helps to calm and relax the nervous system which in turn calms the body and mind. It also is great for reducing stress and decreasing anxiety, it basically lowers blood pressure, improves mood, and decreases muscle tension, as reported by Real Simple.  
 

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