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Quadruple amputee athlete beats all odds with incredible journey of survival and success

Dayton Webber, a professional cornhole player in the American Cornhole League, is defying the odds and captivating audiences with his exceptional throws and accuracy.

Quadruple amputee athlete beats all odds with incredible journey of survival and success
Cover Image Source: Instagram | @daytonwebber

Life doesn't give everyone an equal chance, but some people defy the odds. Dayton Webber, an American Cornhole League (ACL) professional sports player, is making headlines with his great throws and pinpoint accuracy. His story is nothing short of life-affirming and inspiring. Webber, who was born in 1998, was diagnosed with streptococcus pneumonia at the age of 10 months.

The prognosis was so bleak that doctors only gave him a 3% chance of survival. Both of his arms and legs had to be amputated at 11 months old to save his life and prevent the bacterial infection from spreading. Webber grew up to be an ACL Pro Cornhole Player, the association's first quadruple amputee, after spending months in hospitals, according to My Modern Met.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Dayton Webber (@daytonwebber)


 

video of his incredible throws recently gained popularity, even grabbing attention on ESPN's SportsCenter Top 10. Webber nails four shots in a row at a competition in Milwaukee, even using his opponent's bag as a backboard on his final throw. Not only did he dazzle the court audience, but he also won everyone's hearts with his stunning dance moves.

Webber's current performance in the professional cornhole world has struck awe, but it is not his first splendid performance in sports. He began wrestling at the age of seven and four years later, he started winning matches. He is also into laying football, go-karting and ice skating. He doesn't just participate, he competes and he competes well. "I just like to do sports," Dayton told The Washington Post. "I feel like I can play sports and kind of show people what I can do—that I can do sports just as good as them. I feel like I can do anything if I just put my mind to it."


 
 
 
 
 
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Dayton has wrestled competitively in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs for four years. Dayton, who lives in Charles County's Charlotte Hall section with his parents and brothers, began his career with a club in Calvert County. He also wrestled for Rampage Wrestling in Waldorf. Sports is in his blood. When he first started, he piqued the interest of many children and other participants. They inquired how he had lost his hands, feet, and parts of his arms and legs. He responds that it isn't a big deal. Every now and then he said, a kid will doubt Dayton's ability to play or compete. That is what drives him. "Anything they say I can't do, I try to show them I can do it," he added.



 

He also raced go-karts, using Velcro-equipped gloves to control the steering wheel with the insides of his biceps. He enjoys video games such as "Madden NFL 10," which he played while balancing the controls on his lap and pecking at the buttons. According to Dayton's mother, Natalie Webber, he is also the family's most skilled chopstick user. His parents claimed they never pushed him to play or compete and never discouraged his athletic ambitions.

While speaking of him as a kid, Natalie added, "In our family, that's what kids do. All the members of our family are athletically oriented. Anything a kid would want to do, he does." Dayton used to play on a youth football team that had an "A" squad for the best players and a "B" team for the rest of the kids. Dayton was on the "A" team. He has prosthetic legs, but he didn't wear them on the field. Dayton was nicknamed "the Vacuum" by his teammates and coaches because he was so good at recovering fumbles.


 
 
 
 
 
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Due to his physical limitations, Dayton can not perform certain wrestling moves. His opponents, on the other hand, were unable to use certain basic tactics, such as going for his ankles. Wrestling matches are paired based on weight. Dayton competed in the 52- to 55-pound weight class, often against younger opponents. He participated in all the drills his fellow Rampage wrestlers did during practice.

He hustled around on his stumps when they ran laps. Dayton's first wrestling coach was Harry T. Hornick. When the Webbers brought Dayton to him, he thought, "'Poor guy.' But you could tell from the look on his face he was very excited. He had a sparkle in his eye, like, 'This is going to be fun.' I basically started thinking, 'I'll have to figure out how he can wrestle.'" "For a kid to come so close to dying, I think he has it in him -- that drive to survive," Natalie Webber added.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Dayton Webber (@daytonwebber)


 

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