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Professor says young people shouldn't spend time at home to be successful, sparks debate

Many disagreed, highlighting the importance of home as a place of comfort and peace.

Professor says young people shouldn't spend time at home to be successful, sparks debate
Cover Image Source: TikTok | @thewallstreetjournal

As the world continues to grapple with the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic, along with international conflicts and a global economic downturn, finding solace in the comfort of our homes has become a precious refuge amidst these trying times.

In the midst of such stress and uncertainty, being able to relax within the safe confines of our homes serves as a much-needed respite, offering a sense of calm and tranquility amid the chaos unfolding outside. Therefore, when Professor Scott Galloway said in a TikTok video that young people should be at home only when they're sleeping, it sparked a debate.

Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal
Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal

He said, "You should never be at home. That’s what I tell young people. Home is for seven hours of sleep and that’s it. The amount of time you spend at home is inversely correlated to your success professionally and romantically. You need to be out of the house."

The video has been uploaded to the TikTok account of the Wall Street Journal. "If you're not working, you should be with friends, trying to find a mate or working out,” Galloway added. To be successful, he said, "it takes 110%." This video has garnered over 8.5 million views, 490.8k likes and 27k comments. Most people disagreed with the professor's comments for different reasons. While some reminded him of the rent of the houses in the U.S., others spoke of the comfort and peace they felt at their homes.

Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal
Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal

@Joyce commented, "Home is 2700 and I’m an introvert too." @user1080519059194 commented, "I pay for this house, I’m getting my damn money's worth." @lucille.isadora.tures commented, "I don’t want any kind of success that requires me to be out of my house all the time."

@bartjohnson commented, "This guy seems to give the worst advice pretty consistently. So, now I’m skeptical of everything he says." @DJ commented, "Home is where work happens now, unfortunately. So make it the best." @MatCutshall commented, "Very strange thing to preach. Home on my couch with my girl is my happy place."

Image Source: TikTok
Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal

 

Image Source: TikTok
Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal

The professor has not taken into account the jobs of many people or of people who have ailing loved ones. He has also not realized the need for rest in humans beyond their sleep. According to research by Owl Labs, "Several studies over the past few months show productivity while working remotely from home is better than working in an office setting. On average, those who work from home, spend 10 minutes less a day being unproductive, work one more day a week, and are 47% more productive."

Moreover, a study by Standford covering 16,000 workers over a span of 9 months, revealed a noteworthy 13% increase in productivity among those working from home. This boost in performance stemmed from factors such as a quieter and more convenient working environment, resulting in a higher number of calls per minute. Additionally, employees reported dedicating more minutes per shift due to reduced breaks and sick days.

Image Source: TikTok |
Image Source: TikTok | @wallstreetjournal

The study also unveiled improved work satisfaction among remote workers and an impressive 50% reduction in attrition rates. These findings debunk the notion that working from home is inherently detrimental to productivity, showcasing that there are no rigid guidelines dictating the amount of time one should spend at home.