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People sum up what it's like to have loving parents and it is exactly what we needed to hear

When people were asked how their lives were impacted by the presence of their loving parents, their heartwarming responses lit up the Internet.

People sum up what it's like to have loving parents and it is exactly what we needed to hear
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Elina Fairytale, Reddit | u/heatherwants2play

A love like no other.

Representative Image Source: Pexels |  100 files
Representative Image Source: Pexels | 100 files

Parents can shape their kids' lives in ways more than one. They might act strict sometimes, but their presence gives one the shelter they need to weather through the difficult phases of life. Unfortunately, not everyone has the privilege of such a shelter. In some cases, despite having parents, kids feel alone. They do not get the attention and care that they need from them. It is evident from the answers to the question posed by u/Cocs365, who asked people, "What's it like having loving parents?" The responses show how even the smallest of actions by parents impact their children. Here are 10 wholesome replies that prove parents make their children's lives more joyful.

1. Being a stress buster

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Daria Obymaha
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Daria Obymaha

My dad would always say, "If you fail your exam, I'll make you croissants." I'm super type A and would stress out a lot about tests in high school. But I always knew that no matter what I did in life, my dad would do nothing but love me. - u/tea24601 Watching your parents just as excited as you on Christmas. Not because they get gifts but because they're excited to see if you like your gift. If you manage to cry from excitement, then you can literally see the endorphins burst in their heads. - u/dausy

2. Give unconditional love

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Albert Rafael
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Albert Rafael

You just always feel 100% safe and that no matter what happens, everything will be okay. It makes life way better. You don't have to seek companionship outside of your family as much because you already got that "loved" feeling from your family...basically you rarely feel alone when you have loving parents/family. - u/thrivingandstriving It's hard to explain actually. My parents are just always there for me and are so supportive. They share in my achievements, encourage me to get to my goals and are there for me when I'm down. It took me 6 years to get my degree because I was working full-time. Mum and Dad would come over during exam weeks and cook me dinner or do my washing just because they knew how stressed I was. When I had a miscarriage (ectopic, so I had to stay in the hospital for a little while), they dropped in daily with food, toiletries, etc., for both my husband and me. - u/aussie_lurker_1

3. Be your personal cheerleader

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Gustavo Fring
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Gustavo Fring

I had a loving mom but a very sh***y dad. My mom supported me through all my school. Would go to different stores to get me supplies for my projects. She'd try to read the same books I had to so she could engage in critical-thinking discussions. Attended my sporting events and cheered me on. Would lay in bed with me after I'd have a nightmare and run her fingers through my hair till I fell asleep. Would constantly reassure me that I was capable of pursuing my dreams. She made sure to tell me she loved me every day and gave me hugs frequently. She's an amazing woman and I'm so grateful I have her. - u/heatherwants2play It's too wonderful to describe. I remember this exchange I had with my mom. It went something like this. "But Mom, I don't think I'm smart enough to graduate from University." "You are! But even if you don't, you are still a wonderful, kind, hard-working, compassionate person I have ever met." "Geez, stop that!" "Humble too!" Last year, I got my degree with honors. I'm now looking into getting a Masters. - u/AmielJohn

4. Give you wings

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

It's safe to take risks, they'll catch you. - u/fslashd Having loving parents is having parents who create an atmosphere where failure is completely fine and will help you grow from those failures. - u/epicguest321

5. Provide protection

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Vlada Karpovich
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Vlada Karpovich

The best way I can describe it is just a general feeling of security. Just knowing that they're behind you 100% and even when they're mad at you, it's almost always because they're trying to help you in the long run. It's not something you really appreciate until you get older and start to notice kids around you that have to deal with some pretty f****d up shit from their parents. It's kind of slowly realizing how many bad things you've just never had to worry about thanks to your support system. And the best part is how your relationship changes as you get older. When they slowly start treating you like a fellow adult and you get to see them as more of a whole person. - u/Octopus_420

6. Ensure a comfortable life

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anastasiya Gepp
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anastasiya Gepp

I'm 25 (nearly 26). My parents were incredible growing up and they still are. I grew up middle class, never extravagantly wealthy or anything, but we never had to worry about where our next meal was coming from. My mom is a pretty tough lady. She's a 3rd generation Italian immigrant. She kept us (my brother, sister and I) in line and was never very sentimental, but she always cared for us and stuck up for us. My dad is one of 6 siblings. He's the second oldest. He is a very caring, sentimental guy. He's 62 and retired now, but he worked as an information technology project manager for Anheuser Busch and made good money. They both provided well for us, gave us what we needed and were fair in their discipline when they needed to be. I realize at my age now that they sacrificed a lot along the way - taking us to soccer and baseball games, dropping us off and picking us up from school every day, dealing with our being whiny and annoying, all kinds of stuff. - u/70U1E

7. Set examples of real love

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Vlada Karpovich
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Vlada Karpovich

The most beautiful part is watching your parents love each other! Didn't even see how this would be valuable until I became an adult and learned that not everyone gets to grow up seeing healthy love. This plays an important factor in the relationships I have and it's the reason why I'm glad to say I'm a healthy SO. Whenever I hear about people I know in an abusive and toxic relationship, the first thing I always ask is how were their parent's relationship...trauma is a real and unfortunate learning mechanism. - u/partimecollegeboy

8. Allowing children to grow at their own pace

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Any Lane
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Any Lane

My parents are very understanding of the fact that teens need to be able to be teens. My friends and I make a lot of dirty jokes and in general, tend to be really loud. We like to play games like CAH (typical teen stuff). I'm always afraid that my parents will judge me or overhear us talking about these things, but they never mind. During my birthday party, I went back upstairs to bring down some drinks and apologized to my dad for the noise. He looked at me, with the kindest look I've ever seen him give and said, "Don't apologize, you're fine." Later, my mom started talking about how teens just needed a place to be teens and they told me after the party that they had been cracking up at some of the stuff they had overheard from the basement. I appreciate this so much in them. - u/jfederroll

9. They are always on your team

Representative Image Source: Pexels | August de Richelieu
Representative Image Source: Pexels | August de Richelieu

It's like being on a team for life. Whatever decisions I make, I know I have their support 100%. They genuinely only want you to be happy. They never push you into anything but always discuss the options with you and are ready to help you with whatever choice you make. I've always felt respected and listened to. I'm never dismissed, belittled or mocked. I know I have their support for life. It's like a security blanket. One thing that really shows it to me was after a fight. When I was a kid and we had a fight and yelled, it would end in apologizing to each other for yelling and them explaining their reasoning. I've never been made to feel like my feelings aren't valid or don't matter and that's something incredibly important to me now. - u/sapphic-internet

10. Source of right guidance

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

Parents who connect and teach you instead of punish and shame. Who describes behavior as safe and unsafe instead of good and bad. Who notices and tells the child what they appreciate. Who explains what is happening and tries to give the comfort of routines in an uncertain world. Who prompts with choice, "Do you want to start with picking up the blocks or your ball." Who allows children time to complete tasks instead of screaming right now!! Who show empathy at every upset and even disobedience (acknowledge what they wanted) and then gently give redirection or consequences. Who praise them to others. Who doesn't take their behavior personally? Who love and coach themselves through their negative emotions and model and teach the same to the children. Who practice self-care and take time for themselves because when we are hungry, stressed and tired, we feel cranky, no different than an infant. Who understand their floors and walls and tables are not sacred, so don't get mad over messes. - u/KimberlyDBr

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