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People suggest witty paybacks for employee being laid off without warning: 'String them along'

The company was quite inconsiderate in firing the employee but was shameless enough to ask for help and the internet is not having it.

People suggest witty paybacks for employee being laid off without warning: 'String them along'
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | fauxels, Reddit | u/xHiruzenx

As much as factors like good compensation and rewards motivate employees, an uplifting work culture is also a crucial aspect. The measure of good management lies in how they value and respect the employees' hard work and efforts throughout their tenure. Though layoff might be an inevitable choice in some cases of organizational restructuring, the way management carries it out speaks volumes. There are several instances where companies abruptly inform employees about firing them and Reddit user u/xHiruzenx shared one such experience from their previous job. As they posted about how they retaliated against the management's impudent actions, people pitched in some alternative comebacks.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antoni Shkraba Production
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antoni Shkraba Production

"So basically, a month ago my company laid off over 100 employees. No warning, just people being called into HR one by one and being told they were no longer welcome in the building and were immediately escorted out by security," wrote the employee. The way this management handled the layoff was quite inconsiderate and the employee explained, "No one was allowed to get their personal belongings from their desks (managers were allowed to grab a few small things for you but you weren't allowed to go back to your desk). Not the first time it happened this year but this was the biggest yet." This time, the employee was hit by the ruthless layoff and mentioned, "I've spent the last month applying for halfway decent jobs but haven't had much luck."

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ketut Subiyanto
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ketut Subiyanto

"Today out of nowhere, a manager friend of mine (not my manager) messaged me asking to help an employee who needs my assistance. I worked closely with his group so it's not unusual he needs something from me I suppose," mentioned the worker and added, "They didn't have my number so they went through some searching to find a way to message me." Knowing that the manager must've reached out for some critical questions on the internal/supplier audit or their old project which only the employee can help with, they decided not to pay attention to it. "I have no interest in helping the company. They unceremoniously laid me off. I know my friend wasn't involved in my getting laid off and he's treated me well while I worked there but f*** the company," and added, "I opened the message and didn't reply. I simply just left them on 'read.'"

Image Source: Reddit | u/mwonch
Image Source: Reddit | u/mwonch
Image Source: Reddit | u/Askduds
Image Source: Reddit | u/Askduds
Image Source: Reddit | LittleWhiteGirl
Image Source: Reddit | u/LittleWhiteGirl

The employee concluded, "I know it's nothing too exciting but they dug their hole so it's time to lie in it." While some users shared similar experiences with layoffs, many recommended a smarter option that could've profited the employee. "Reply 'Thanks for reaching out. I'm happy to assist you as a consultant, my hourly rate is $200 with a 10-hour minimum,' This should solve that problem fast," u/ThatWideLife commented. "First call the police to the building and say that you were robbed. Report that the company has taken your property and refuses to return it" u/Southern-Beautiful-3 suggested. "Nah, string them along. Let them think you're going to help. 'Hey, sure thing what’s the issue?' (Don’t reply for two days) Then respond with a question or two every few days or so but don’t lead them on the correct path. Suspend their ability to find a solution faster. You have the spigot here," u/ro536ud wrote.

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