NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

People share 10 decent-paying jobs that require no degree and almost no human interaction

People suggested various jobs with zero requirements for social skills. And the bonus point? These jobs also fill the pockets well.

People share 10 decent-paying jobs that require no degree and almost no human interaction
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Kutlay Uyar; Reddit | u/No-Jello-1536

These jobs are heaven for introverts.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | RF._.studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | RF._.studio

Not many jobs in the world perfectly suit the sensibilities of introverts. They either require social skills, several degrees or offer less-than-desirable money. It is hard to find something that is an absolute heaven for this group who like nothing more than enjoying their own company or that of their favorite people. u/Tredicidodici did a solid for all the loners and asked, "What's a decently paying job that requires no degree and almost no human interaction?" A job with no embarrassing icebreakers, does not require you to invest a lot of your time in studying and pays well seems like an impossible combination. But this comments section proved otherwise. People suggested various decent-paying jobs with zero requirements for social skills. Here are 10 jobs mentioned in this thread that will make every introvert's dream come true.

1. Truck drivers

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Gustavo Fring
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Gustavo Fring

Truck driving. I'm a high school dropout and make 100K a year. No human interaction at all (Occasional interaction with a deer). Just to clarify, there are a lot of bad truck companies out there. You still have to do your homework and find a good company. u/No-Jello-1536. My father is a truck driver. Makes 80-90k a year. I'd say he averages around 45 hours a week, which isn't too bad. He hauls fuel and is home 5 nights a week. This is in South Dakota as well, so lower pay than elsewhere. u/Zyhre

2. School custodian

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Nathan Cowley
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Nathan Cowley

School custodian. I make $55k a year, not the best pay, not the worst. I clean the school alone while I listen to podcasts. It’s not a bad gig. 5 weeks of vacation, sick days, I work 4-10s in the summer, great pension and benefits. I’m off weekends and holidays. u/allykat19. School custodians make decent money in most New York school districts. But most are also there forever because the pension is where it’s at. You retire, getting nearly your salary plus SSI. u/ernyc3777

3. Mail carrier

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Liza Summer
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Liza Summer

Mail carrier for USPS. They don’t even drug test anymore. It’s a federal union job with a pension and the pay is okay at the moment with our contract in negotiation, it won’t be astronomical, but I have faith it will be more reasonable than a lot of doom-sayers. I did the college track and got a 4-year degree. I made good money but was never happy. I started as a carrier the same month I turned 40, I get paid to walk and honestly, have never been happier. I’m an introvert and simply don’t involve myself in office drama and I rarely have interaction with people while I am out delivering, maybe 30 seconds at most, and even I can keep a pleasant demeanor for such interactions. u/GalleryCorpse

4. Railroad switchman

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ngoc Vuong
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ngoc Vuong

Railroad switchman/brakeman, Assuming you’re in the US anyway. I see very few people in my day-to-day work. It’s great! And it pays well now, especially if you work on mainline rail. u/MrFlibble81. My neighbor did well as a freight train conductor. The downside was last-minute calls that would take him out of town for weeks. If he was tired, he wouldn't answer the phone (but that was frowned on). u/oddlotz. Came to say this. I know conductors at CN are making comfortably into six figures, as long as you don’t mind being on call all the time. u/snyderman3000.

5. Electric utility worker

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Field Engineer
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Field Engineer

Electric utility field workers, although you are working outside, it can be risky, you have to work weekends and you need to be available when called upon. Pays very well though. u/swentech. I manage this work in the Midwest, these workers make a lot of money ($150k some of our field leaders pull down $250 yearly), but there is a slowdown in work across the country, but it’s expected to pick back up soon as a lot of the infrastructure is in dire need of upgrade. Union is the way to go. You can sign the books as a groundsman and still make $30+ an hour running tools and odd stuff on the job. Most jobs run 50 hours a week, so, a lot of added income with the overtime. It can be a lot of work, but your typical crew is only 4-5 other members and if you’re a good worker, you’ll be left alone most of the time. u/threeflavourcornetto

6. Insurance agents

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mikhail Nilov
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mikhail Nilov

Insurance. Claims examining. You usually need to have a general knowledge of how claims work to get into the industry, but once you're here, it's pretty isolating. I've gone whole days in the office not talking or interacting with another human and I don't have to talk to customers or make any phone calls. u/The_Quicktrigger. My favorite job I ever had was data processing at a Medicare claims adjustment firm - a company hired by doctors' offices to check Medicare claims and resubmit where needed to get them the most money back. I just did the data entry end. This was over 10 years ago, but I made 13+/ hr, full benefits and all I did was sit at my cubical listening to my iPod, copying/pasting information between systems. When I finished a file all I did was email my supervisor, who was literally across the hall and get sent a new file. No degree. It was glorious. And then Medicare changed the time period doctors had to resubmit, so almost the entire department was laid off as a result. I was devastated. u/TribalMog.

7. Paralegal

Representative Image Source: Pexels | August de Richelieu
Representative Image Source: Pexels | August de Richelieu

Paralegal. In the right situation, working for the right lawyer or law firm and if you are good at research. In my jurisdiction, there are no licensing or degree requirements other than that a licensed attorney is overseeing your work. A caveat is that some jurisdictions do require some sort of qualifications. u/mag55555. I work part-time for an attorney and speak to her about once per month. I do have to call clients if she gets overwhelmed, but only to schedule appointments for them. I work from home. u/oscarbutnotthegrouch

8. Sanitation workers

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tima Miroshnichenko
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tima Miroshnichenko

Even in other industries. I work in a food factory. Our sanitation team is third shift (6 pm-4 am). They work 4×10s (Saturday included though) and they don't really have to talk to anyone outside of getting their assignments for the night. They clear $55K per year with the overnight-time bonus and we have a union with good benefits and a raise every year. Sanitation workers do alright. u/littlebitsofspider.

9. Industrial plant operator

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kateryna Babaieva
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kateryna Babaieva

Industrial plant operator. Can be for wastewater, power, whatever. Learn how to punch buttons and not touch things you shouldn't. Can work graveyard and never have to talk to another soul and make more money. u/Psigun. Water Supply Operator. I currently work at a plant that runs 2 shifts per day, one operator per shift. I only talk to the other guy for maybe 20 minutes a day during shift change. It's a high school diploma or equivalent to start, can apply for licensure after a year and then step up all the way to class 3 after five years. I make good money in my area,and the pay is decent in other areas hiring for my level in higher cost-of-living areas. I really enjoy it. In 8-hour shifts alone, just have to start and stop pumps, fill this, drain that, run a few tests on the water and log it. An 8-hour shift is about 4 hours of work and 4 hours of time. A lot of reading, watching movies, playing on my switch and listening to the radio and podcasts. I really enjoy it. u/kirky7456

10. Petroleum landman

Representative Image Source: Pexels |  Deane Bayas
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Deane Bayas

Petroleum Landman. Travel to some god-forsaken places, but the money is great and you have very little human interaction. I worked on a project once in New Mexico for 2 years and spoke to one person 3 times on the phone, with no face-to-face interactions. The rest of my communication was via text or email. u/ltsmobilelandman. If you have no title experience, I'd go to a broker and tell them that. Then I'd tell them I'd work extra hard to learn. Midland Texas is full of land brokerage firms and, due to the ebbs and flows typical to the industry, are usually hiring. In the past, when I've been laid off, I print a bunch of resumes and head to Midland, where I knock on doors until someone hires me. u/ltsmobilelandman.

More Stories on Scoop