ANIMALS
FUNNY
INSPIRING
LIFESTYLE
NEWS
PARENTING
RELATIONSHIPS
SCIENCE AND NATURE
WHOLESOME
WORK
Contact Us Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

People share 10 'cheat codes' that they used to tackle everything life threw at them

Discover 10 real-life 'cheat codes' as people unveil practical hacks for making life's challenges much easier.

People share 10 'cheat codes' that they used to tackle everything life threw at them
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Matheus Ferrero, Reddit | u/qqasdfzz

Real-life cheat codes

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Bubi Bubi
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Bubi Bubi

Cheat codes are commonly used in video games to bypass certain difficulties of the game. The same concept can be applied in the real world to make life a bit easier for people. Whether it's finding success in one's career or personal development, doing things a particular way and having some knowledge can go a long way. u/Homo_luden5 asked the community, "What are some real-life cheat codes?" Here are 10 of the most insightful answers that people had to share.

1. Making friends 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Phil Nguyen
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Phil Nguyen

You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. u/qqasdfzz. When they tell you something about their interests, ask them a question about that interest and listen to the answer. u/Hot_Error_4401. I really like this one. Never heard of it but makes sense. I know so many people that try so hard to make friends and they make it all about themselves. u/riaKoob1

2. The perks of being polite 

Representative Imaage Source: Pexels | Řaj Vaishnaw
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Řaj Vaishnaw

Being polite increases your odds of getting what you want. u/PositiveRainCloud. Call center employee here, absolutely this. Polite and kind people get discounts and better help. u/Ishnula. Literally, any customer service employee anywhere can tell you that being polite and understanding gets people to go above and beyond for you. Being rude is going to get you the absolute bare minimum that my job requires me to do. u/esoteric_enigma.  Polite but firm is the way, to communicate your needs, but always be nice about it. u/Zeravor

3. Learn social skills 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tirachard Kumtanom
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tirachard Kumtanom

Build social skills and the ability to understand human behavior. This will help you in everything in life rather than just existing on pure talents and being an expert. u/Wookie-fish806. Emotional intelligence, understanding how others are feeling and being able to read a room go a long way. u/Reddit. Deconstructing people is my family’s pastime. It helps understand why people behave the way they do. This knowledge can be used for both good and bad so it’s important that you are doing it for good reasons. u/Electronic_Karma

4. Being a good cook 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Rene Asmussen
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Rene Asmussen

Cooking - your life will be better, and it's a great way to impress friends or a date. Ask a follow-up question or two - if you're getting a negative result in a non-personal interaction, you can sometimes find out about alternatives. In a conversation, asking people to tell you more about something they thought was worth mentioning once in a while often makes for a better conversation. Sometimes you even learn interesting things you didn't know. Pick something you enjoy and either look up a recipe (or three) OR if there's something a family member cooks that you really like, see if they'll show or tell you how to do it. For me, I learned to make Tex-Mex style rice, stir fry with noodles that I like, chili, and scrambled eggs. Scrambled eggs are actually something I'm still trying to master, I started making my own scrambled eggs at 12 and I am now in my 30s. They're all things with a pretty low floor (they're edible unless you REALLY mess up), but you can tweak them endlessly to get it just how you like it, and it's good practice. u/Kradget

5. Managing finances well 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Nappy
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Nappy

Personal finance is probably the biggest one. Understanding credit cards, savings rates, investing, debt, etc. will save you so much time and money in the long run. What you decide to do with your money could be the difference between retiring early and having decades of freedom or working until you die. u/resistingvoid. This is why I’m studying finance in college. Not necessarily because I’m so excited about money. I just want the personal knowledge of what to do with my own money and not rely on advisors and the like. u/saxtoncan

6. Having the strength to say no 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Lil Artsy
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Lil Artsy

The word "no" is a complete sentence. It is the most powerful cheat code. u/jerub. "No" is the word of personal freedom to keep you from getting dragged into things you don't wanna do. "Yes" is the word for seizing opportunity, to take a chance when it's presented to you. To use only one either makes you a shut-in grumpy weirdo or a doormat. u/Fixthefernbacks. "Yes" and "no" are powerful words. Mean them when you say them. And respect them when you hear them. u/Fluid_Comfortable488

7. Make small talk 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | EKATERINA BOLOVTSOVA
Representative Image Source: Pexels | EKATERINA BOLOVTSOVA

Be born wealthy. Obviously, that's not accessible. But, learn how to make small talk, as those kinds of details can be the difference between getting opportunities vs getting shut out. I'm a genuinely curious person so I ask people questions about themselves, and it turns out, most people love talking about themselves, so they have a positive association with me. u/imakenosensetopeople. This can also help in work situations. Asking questions about your job gives the impression of you being invested in what you’re doing. u/FluidSock9774

8. Avoid alcohol

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Isabella Mendes
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Isabella Mendes

Don’t drink alcohol. You save a ton of money and you never get hangovers. My son can’t drink for medical reasons. When I realized how much more time he had as a college student it was pretty eye-opening. Downside: you miss out on the social aspects of sharing drinks, and being the only sober person can suck. u/RockerElvis. I almost never drink. Over Christmas break, I thought, hey I used to like Jack and Coke, maybe I’ll have some. I would have 1-2 a night over a few nights and I couldn’t figure out why I was having terrible sleeps. Work started up a few days ago, no booze and I feel great again. u/SgtGo

9. Ask to get things in writing 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | picjumbo.com
Representative Image Source: Pexels | picjumbo.com

Ask to get it in writing. If someone is refusing you things you know you have the right to, request that they write (or type, doesn't matter) what they said on paper. They will back down almost 100% of the time. It goes from they said/I said to a legally accountable document, and if you're being gaslighted, they know they're denying you your rights and would never want to provide you with a document that confirms that they were talking s***. u/JustAnotherFool896

10. Fasting and eating less 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tranmautritam
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tranmautritam

Intermittent fasting and just eating less in general. If you live a typical sedentary life like the average person, you need significantly fewer calories than you think you need. If you can get your calorie intake down below 1500 through means like intermittent fasting the results are you lose weight, you save money, you feel better, you look better. All just from eating less, plus your body gets used to the hunger where it's really not that bad. u/Reddit

More Stories on Upworthy