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People reveal 10 characteristics about the millionaires and billionaires they worked with

Insiders share millionaires and billionaires' eccentricities, sharing 10 hilarious and unique anecdotes from their time working with them.

People reveal 10 characteristics about the millionaires and billionaires they worked with
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Cats Coming; Reddit | u/sunnybestie

What sets millionaires apart

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tima Miroshnichenko
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Tima Miroshnichenko

People who become millionaires or billionaires do certain things differently from most people. From small quirks to more noticeably different behaviors, these are the things that clearly made a distinction. Working with such individuals can be an interesting experience for most. One gets to see how they react to certain situations and learn a Similarly, u/sunnybestie asked people on the internet, "To people who have also worked with multimillionaires or billionaires, what is something different they do from ordinary people?" Here are some insightful and funny answers that people shared.

1. Driving is a waste of effort 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | JESHOOTS.com
Representative Image Source: Pexels | JESHOOTS.com

I didn't realize that the act of driving is some peasant s*** till I met them. u/Pissmaster1972. I work for a major corporation. One of my colleagues started talking to a director as they were leaving. They were both walking towards the train station and she assumed he was also getting a train. As they got there, a limo pulled up and he nonchalantly said, "Bye" and left. u/AstonVanilla. 

2. Getting a private chef for a casual lunch 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | ELEVATE
Representative Image Source: Pexels | ELEVATE

Hire a private chef for a casual Tuesday lunch with her girlfriends. $2k, just like that. u/Tall-Poem-6808. Not just on call they will be there and cook regularly. Or someone drops it off and it has reheat instructions. The cognitive load of shopping, planning, cooking and then cleaning up must save them energy. Sometimes, I cheat that system by just drinking a meal replacement shake. Take that, Bezos. u/altcastle. That's the thing with the extremely wealthy. An overwhelming portion of the time and effort that ordinary people expend just to maintain their lives is taken care of by other people. It's very easy to find the time for social and leisure activities when someone else takes care of all the mundane s*** for you. u/tacknosaddle

3. Lack of social barriers

Representative Image Source: Pexels | nappy
Representative Image Source: Pexels | nappy

Have no fear when addressing anyone, no social barriers. u/MooseFeatures94. I think this is a good/underrated one. Being confident when speaking/walking/being in a social event of any kind will automatically help you in a bunch of ways. It's also something cheap/free that anyone can do. u/Toomanyacorns. The thing is a lot of the super-wealthy aren't fearless. You just don't see as much of it in the media. I worked with a guy who is the richest in the state he lives in and he was incredibly shy. He could put on a face long enough for the media but hated the attention. He mellowed out some after he retired, but this isn't universally true. u/caltheon

4. Not wearing belts 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

I worked for a billionaire who was an ordinary person. He stood in the line to use the copy machine just like the rest of us. He wore a suit and tie every day but never wore a belt. After working for him for about 10 years, I finally asked him why he doesn't wear a belt. He said that his pants stayed up without one. u/backbaybilly. Not wearing a belt is a sign of good tailoring. With more formal clothes, in particular, bespoke and high-end trousers often don't even have belt loops. u/moosegeese74. Wealthy people are often very uncomfortable with how much money they have. It's weird walking around knowing you could change the lives of every single person you see but feeling like you need to keep it all for yourself or you won't be safe, but also knowing that anyone who knows how wealthy you are knows that you have that ability but don't choose it. Maybe that's why he doesn't wear a belt (it's why I don't), but there's also a chance it's just one of the many things he's doing to not seem obnoxious or feel like everyone is judging his purchasing choices. Having "everyone knows I have more than their entire family will make in a lifetime" money can genuinely be really hard and uncomfortable for some people. I don't feel bad for them by any means, but it is pretty common. I've always assumed it's part of why there's so much addiction among the super-wealthy. u/forsurenotmymain

5. Just the right amount of confidence

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

One old money, rich person treated me to a fancy meal and she was super polite and nice and tipped well. What struck me was the decisiveness and confidence that everyone there would cater to her and they did. She wanted x dish that they didn't make that day and they made it. The one that stuck with me was at the end when she said, "I want a cappuccino with (something). I want them to put a design on it." I've gotten cute cappuccinos in my life. It doesn't even cost extra. It never occurred to me to just ask for everything I want all the time. This was the same person, who on a business trip, hugged me after the flight. "I did it, (womanthorned)!" Me: "Oh, was this your first time in economy" and she goes, "No, flying commercial," just so we all understand how rich. u/woman_thorned

6. Flying to watch soccer matches

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

My son's friend, when in elementary school, dad was one of the 2 founders of Capital One. Mom had a secretary for play dates. Dad would fly to London to watch Tottenham. Had a permanent seat. Their London house was next to J.K. Rowling's. You couldn't tell by the way they dressed or their cars. But their vacations were a big difference. The strange thing is that their son loved a mango juice sold maybe 10-15 min from their house. I always made sure we had some for mine. I send it to him via Amazon occasionally. u/dcgradc. Yes, my rich friend acts/dresses humble/has a jeep (not saying it's a bad car, but for a billionaire who could have anything). But her family spent 3 weeks sailing around the Mediterranean on a private yacht. 7 of them. They have 4 different vacation houses outside of their main house. One of them has a bigger than Olympic-sized pool. u/fromchunkwithlove

7. Better time management skills 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | JESHOOTS.com
Representative Image Source: Pexels | JESHOOTS.com

He managed time very differently than anyone I was used to. For example, our meeting with him began precisely on schedule, lasted 30 minutes and there was no chit-chat. Before this meeting, we had a pre-meeting with his admin to discuss expectations. The admin explained that we had to be on time, have no introductions/titles just names, no small talk, no marketing and be prepared to answer technical and financial questions quickly and succinctly. For this latter, if there were numbers, we had to know precisely which page of the material had the information. When the meeting took place, we were brought in exactly -- to the second -- at the start time. Sat down and within 30 seconds, he was asking us all manner of questions. I had to field technical questions that appeared to be asked not so much for whether my answer was right, but that I didn't hesitate. I also gained a healthy respect for my manager as he was sharp and answered quickly and accurately. u/frank-sarno

8. Not sitting in the front seat 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mike Bird
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mike Bird

Years ago, a friend of mine's dad was trying to sell his start-up company and picked up an investor at the airport. He was proud of his classic Rolls Royce and noticed the investor looking around, playing with the air vents. So he said, "Is this your first time in a Rolls Royce?" The guy said no, but it was his first time in the front seat. - u/LanceFree. I used to do in-person one-on-one market research interviews with luxury car owners and one thing that struck me after hundreds of interviews was that the only people who drove Rolls Royce's themselves were self-made "new money" wealthy people. The old money people all had Rolls Royce's, but they were driven around in them because that's one of the reasons that you get a Rolls is the incredible back seat. If the old money were driving themselves, then they would have luxury cars, but they very rarely drove Rolls. It may have been one of those social faux pax to wealthy old money to be in the same seat as their drivers or something like that, but I never actually asked about it. u/alwaysfailatlife

9. Spontaneously flying to Paris 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Chris Molloy
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Chris Molloy

I briefly worked for a guy who spontaneously decided to take about 8 of his favorite employees on his private jet for a flight to Paris just because he wanted to visit his favorite restaurant and wanted to go out drinking and didn't want to do it alone. So, with about 2 hours' notice, he arranged an "emergency business trip" to get away from his wife, grabbed some guys from the office and basically told them, "You're coming with me tonight and we'll all have a good time, you don't have a choice, but you'll get paid for this." The restaurant, bars and hotel they visited weren't super fancy, but they were still very nice and the boss paid for everything, including paying the guys overtime wages because they were "working." Randomly taking a private jet for a flight on such short notice must have cost at least $20k plus another 10k or so in additional expenses. The same guy also bought an airworthy Spitfire fighter plane from WWII just because he thought it was cool. He didn't have a pilot's license and had no intention of flying it, but he employed a bunch of people just to take care of the plane and fly it at various air shows. He did put his company name on the side of the plane, so I guess the excuse he used to justify the purchase was that the plane was a way of advertising his company. u/Kitten-Eater

10. Choosing to live frugally 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | maitree rimthong
Representative Image Source: Pexels | maitree rimthong

One of my friends is going to be a billionaire soon. His father is dying and he's the sole heir to the family fortune. He already had access to it but chose to live a middle-class life instead. It's important to him to teach his kids the value of hard work. So he's basically the exception. u/bluegiant85. It's usually not the people who worked for the money that is the problem. It's their kids and those that inherit the wealth for having done nothing that is all screwed up. Glad to see your friend realizes this early. u/Vmagnum. Family friends are like this, but almost to the point of irritation. Like, really, are we seriously debating waiting an hour for the bus to save $10? You just made a thousand times that amount in interest just by reading the schedule. u/Serious_Welder_5194.

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