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NICU mom shares why octopus plushies are great for comforting premature babies

For expectant mothers, choosing octopus plushies from 'Octopuses for a Preemie' can be a wonderful way to provide comfort and support to their premature babies in the NICU.

NICU mom shares why octopus plushies are great for comforting premature babies
Cover Image Source: Instagram | @octa4apreemieus

While pregnancy commonly follows a period of nine months, there are couples who bring premature babies into the world. These babies often run the risk of ill health among other concerning factors. The initial periods for a premature child can be difficult, especially if they're in incubators, away from their mums. However, there are sources that aid in this process. A Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) mama shared something that touched her. Calvary Hobart shared her perspective on something adorable yet helpful in the form of octo plushies. You may be aware of plushies as toys that provide satisfaction and are great companions for growing babies. However, often there are octo plushies found with new babies. These, the NICU mama revealed, are way more purposeful than you think.



 

The plushies made in the shape of an octopus with the head and tentacles are designed by a group called 'Octopuses for a Preemie.' These are specifically designed for premature babies also known as 'preemies.' The plushies from this group have a unique design which includes separate knitted tentacles attached to the body of the octo plushies. The toys are knitted with a soft fabric but the reason behind their unusual design is interesting. The tentacles can be individually held and have a coiled or wired structure. It's almost like knitted strings coiled to form the tentacle. That's exactly why it is the most profound item to be near your preemie. Hobart shared that the tentacles are designed as such for a preemie to hold on to.



 

Often when babies are born before time, they are sent to the NICU and require special attention. In this period, the preemie is surrounded by wires and tubes which they tend to grasp due to their habit of being attached to the umbilical cord. With the umbilical cord being cut off and the baby in need of grasping something, they tend to hold on to wires and tubes that can be dangerous and fatal for them. The octopus plushies greatly aid the preemies as their tentacles serve as an acting umbilical cord for the infants to hold on to. With a similar grip and build right beside them, they will leave the wires alone. What's more, these soft-knitted fabrics will ensure zero damage or threat to the child. This is a boon to all preemies who naturally want and need to be connected to their mums.



 

The post also mentioned a trick by the NICU mama to make the octo plushie feel more like a mama for the preemies. She explained that the premature babies would naturally want to cling to their mothers but being in the incubator prevents contact. She suggested that moms-to-be get an octo plushie and keep it in their shirt for a while. "This will make the teddy smell like you," she added. "Being a NICU mama, something that pulled on my heartstrings the most was leaving my precious baby girl in the hands of someone else. So having something like this that would've smelt like me and given her comfort would improve my mom's guilt dramatically by knowing that even though we aren't together, a little piece of me is still right there with her."



 

The octo plushies which are globally known to be amazing toys are also comforting and protective replicas of mamas to their preemies. She concluded her post by saying, "It's a nice keepsake to show them when they're all grown up." For all moms-to-be, the Octo plushies are a great choice when picking out your baby's toys!


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Tiny Hearts (@tinyheartseducation)


 

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