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Mom's tweet about mothers fantasizing about hospital stays sparks a crucial discussion

Mothers are feeling so burdened with their responsibilities that the prospect of getting admitted to a hospital seems appealing.

Mom's tweet about mothers fantasizing about hospital stays sparks a crucial discussion
Cover Image Source: Pexels | Tima Miroshnichenko; Twitter | @emilykmay

Hospital stays typically don't correspond with ideas of relaxation and fun. Patients miss the warmth of their home, being around their loved ones and mostly being healthy. But guess what? There are moms out there who are so burned out that they would love to check themselves into a hospital for a couple of days. The rest of us might find this whole idea shocking and confusing, but Emily (@emilykmay) on X (formerly Twitter) called attention to how common this sentiment is through a tweet that sparked an elaborate debate.

Representative Image Source: Pexels/ Photo by Keira Burton
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Keira Burton

"I don't know if the lack of community care in our culture is more evident than when moms casually say they daydream about being hospitalized for something only moderately serious so that they are forced not to have any responsibilities for like 3 days," Emily, who is a mom herself, wrote on the platform. "And other moms are like, 'yeah totally' while childfree Gen Z girls' mouths hang open in horror." Emily highlights how a mom who gets no days off and no breaks from her parenting duties experiences intense physical and mental exhaustion.



 

In such situations, moms—who are still considered to be the default parent—seek time out from their daily responsibilities. Many women dropped into the comment section to share their thoughts on how burned out they feel and what they often fantasize about to seek temporary escape from their situations.

@Why__President said, "This makes me sad. Husbands could really step up. I know that I try my best." Emily followed up the conversation with internet folks and remarked, "Even having a spouse that is supportive isn’t always enough! That’s why I said community care. When you have little kids, it feels like you need way more parents." 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

@loverofsnark wrote, "If only there were someone in these women's lives who could help. Perhaps the fathers of their children. Imagine how much easier mothers' lives would be if fathers did their fair share." @SarahWS11790 quipped, "I've said this as a joke before, especially after my husband got COVID and spent three days laying in bed. However, I think moms all over the world and in different periods have had it much harder than modern Western women. We just joke about it more and also freely complain."

"See, I disagree as far as having it easier as modern women because while we have tons of practical advances in technology, in the olden days, they had community care," Emily responded. @claytoothpaste shared, "I used to daydream about falling down the stairs or getting in a car accident and breaking a leg or something so I could get a couple of weeks off work without anyone from my mentally abusive job bothering me."



 



 



 

@DuckieLouise added, "And can confirm: I have the fondest memories of my appendicitis that almost burst three weeks after my third was born because in emergency had to go get it taken out. I let my neighbor take my toddlers and I let my husband give the baby formula and I slept until I was rested. Under the knife, but still. It was nice." Many mothers even went as far as to admit that they fantasized about getting divorced so their husbands would have to take up fifty percent of the child's responsibilities. Here is to hoping all mothers get a reasonable break from their hectic routine of childrearing whenever they need it.



 

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