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Mom urges people to let their kids help disabled students in exams by sharing her daughter's experience

After seeing the struggles of disabled students in school, the mother advocated for letting children assist disabled peers in exams.

Mom urges people to let their kids help disabled students in exams by sharing her daughter's experience
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Jessica Lewis, X | @nvvarsha

Students with disabilities often face more hurdles in their daily experiences compared to their peers. But their problems can be alleviated with the help of kind strangers, who are willing to lend a helping hand to them. Such gestures go a long way in helping disabled kids navigate the challenging world. Varsha (@nvvarsha) is a mother who decided to positively impact a disabled child's life by asking her daughter to volunteer as her reader/writer for her final exam. In a thread on X (previously Twitter), the woman narrated the whole incident and explained why other parents should also consider letting their children assist specially-abled children.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Louis Bauer
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Louis Bauer

 



 

Varsha recounts how she came across a mother's plea in a group, seeking a fourth grader's assistance as a reader and writer for her daughter's final exam. She writes, "On a whim, I asked my 4th grader daughter if she would like to be one." She told her daughter that she had no problem with her saying no and that she should do it only if she wanted to. The little girl bravely stepped up to help the disabled girl write her exam. What made the gesture even more special was how the little girl went to help out while she had her own exams going on.



 

Her daughter's only demand was that her mom accompany her to the exam center as she did not want to go alone. Varsha found this to be a reasonable demand. She shares, "The exam center was an hour away, and we left early in the morning. The same girl who hates waking up early got up without much fuss and didn't complain one bit." Upon reaching the exam center, the mother got to know that it was a school for disabled children.



 

There, she learned how difficult it was for specially-abled kids to find writers. Varsha reflected on how many people emphasized the importance of inclusive education but that the ground reality was completely different. Kids who have learning disabilities suffer quite a bit in normal schools. They are often subject to bullying and end up losing a lot of their confidence in the process. The teachers at normal schools are also not overly supportive, eventually forcing parents to shift them to special schools.



 

She explains, "Parents need to run around in circles to get disability certificates, IQ assessments, opinion letters for kids to get extra writing time, writer-reader help in the exams, etc." Varsha also discovered the depressing reality that these specially-abled kids were "shunned" in the residential areas that they lived in. This comes about as a result of them not being able to follow the rules or talking too much. Specially-abled kids love to have friends but are avoided by other kids because of their condition. Varsha got to meet the specially-abled girl that her daughter was helping out and discovered that she was fun to hang out with.



 

They ended up having a dinner date instead of meeting for a short tea. She concludes the post by imploring parents to let their kids help out specially-abled kids in whatever little way they can. She writes, "Teach your neurotypical/normal kids to adjust a bit for them. If your child is struggling at school, get them assessed before labeling them as lazy." People loved Varsha's gesture and shared their thoughts in the comments section. @swatigar said, "Kudos to the young volunteer. I didn't realize that it was hard to get hold of writers. Just cause I didn't ever come across a request so far."



 

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