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Man writes an entire book for 2 years just to propose to his girlfriend in the last chapter of it

'Roz is great at always trying to create beautiful surprises for us, so it didn't seem too out of the ordinary,' said Holland.

Man writes an entire book for 2 years just to propose to his girlfriend in the last chapter of it
Cover Image Source: YouTube | Roz Weston

With Valentine's day just around the corner, people are planning surprises for their loved ones. However, it can't be better than what Roz Weston did for the woman he loves. Weston, a TV host and correspondent, released his memoir, "A Little Bit Broken" in September and saved the last chapter for his partner Katherine Holland. In a YouTube video he created to propose to Holland, he says, "I may be the only person who has ever written an entire book just to propose to the person they love who, by the way, is the greatest person I have ever known."



 

 

He adds that the final chapter is the only one Holland hasn't read. "In the front of the book, there is a dedication and it just reads, 'For Katherine, everything that matters, everything that shines Page 321' and Page 321 is where the final chapter is," he says in the video. Weston told People, "Katherine read through every draft as I wrote it for almost two years, but I saved the last chapter. Once I had an actual copy of the book, Katherine read it for the first time with me and our kid. I filmed the entire thing and the video will make you cry, I promise."

"But no, nobody knew ahead of time," he continued. "When I sold the book to the publisher, they had no idea. I sold it without the proposal. I snuck in the last chapter to my editor on the day my final manuscript was due." 



 

In the proposal video, Holland gets a note from Weston, "Don't worry, you got this." Then she sees Weston and their daughter, Roxy, sitting on a sofa in their home, where she later reads the final chapter. He wrote in the book, "I'm not the hero of this story, Katherine is. I always thought that the goal was to find somebody who completes you but that's just not the case. The goal of the mission in that beautifully crushing adventure is to find somebody who is everything that you are not. I wish I was a person who led with compassion; I wish I was more open, and less cynical and only ever saw the best in people. But I'm not. It is still hard for me, but it's okay. Katherine is all those things. She is all those things I'm not and everything I hope to be." He then asks her to marry him and they all hug each other.

Holland had no idea about the proposal. "Roz is great at always trying to create beautiful surprises for us, so it didn't seem too out of the ordinary, but I certainly didn't expect a proposal," she said in the interview.



 

 

"We had never really discussed getting married, as it wasn't really a priority for either of us — only that we thought it would be lovely if our daughter could be a part of it — so I was truly shocked." Weston said that he actually began the book with the line, "When you choose the person to spend the rest of your life with, you're also choosing the person who'll tell your story when you're gone. And if you're lucky, you'll find someone who only sees the best in you."

He eventually saved it for the last chapter and gave away the ending of the book on his YouTube video. He admitted that he "needed people to know there's a happy ending" since the book is a tough read tracing his struggle with opioid addiction and Tourette's syndrome, and the grief of losing his father.



 

The couple is now planning their wedding. "Katherine is currently on the hunt for the perfect dress," he said. "And, yes, she finally got an engagement ring. I didn't have one when I proposed because I couldn't risk spoiling the secret. She chose a custom-made combination of low-profile black diamonds and sapphire on a gold band."

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