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Man shares why black kids need to see themselves represented in different professions

Librarian shares how he tries to inspire his community with his profession in such a way that they can see themselves pursuing it in the future.

Man shares why black kids need to see themselves represented in different professions
Cover Image Source: X | @3kingvisions

It is no secret that representation is vital in today's age. Racial divide for many years prevented people of color from having access to many career opportunities. However, sheer perseverance has made people like Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan and Oprah Winfrey break those barriers and make a place for themselves in those previously untouched territories. Black folks have made a name for themselves in rap and sports, being a source of pride and joy for their community. Seeing people like themselves of such high stature, most of the children in the community aspire to make a name for themselves in those fields. Similarly, Billy Allen—who goes by @3kingvisions on X—believes that other fields also need to step up in representation so that young children develop aspirations for themselves. Moreover, he wishes that the community opens up the children's view of these fields and does not limit them only to music and sports.

Image Source: X/@3kingvisions
Image Source: X | @3kingvisions

Allen's motto is that librarians are the "Leaders of the New Cool." On his social media, he regularly shares how being a librarian has not only brought him joy but also given him an opportunity to help his community. In one of his posts, he wrote, "Becoming a librarian has allowed me to inspire our young kings that they can be great in life besides being an athlete or a rapper!" To this, he got many positive and encouraging responses.

Everyone was all for broadening the scope of these brilliant young minds. But one reply that held a contrasting opinion stood out. @LizBC1908 commented, "They can be great in life while playing sports. Michael Jordan has a career beyond sports. Shaq got his doctorate after playing sports. Kyrie is a basketball player and a business owner."



 

In order to reply to this and make his point precise, the librarian made another video. After explaining the whole situation he said, "Young black kids, kids of color really need to see people of color in professions like a librarian." Seeing someone like them in such positions makes them believe that they can also achieve these positions. This belief that it is not out of reach is crucial. The librarian adds, "when I say they need to see someone it is so they can really visualize like okay- I can do this."

Image Source: X/@3kingvisions
Image Source: X | @3kingvisions

He shares his own story to explain why representation is essential. While growing up he never saw anyone who looked like him as a librarian. There was no one who made him "want to be a librarian." He wanted to be like Mike and Kobe because he saw them, who looked like him flourishing in those fields. Therefore, "You gotta have the black doctors, you gotta have the black denim, the black librarian." He ended by saying that there is also a huge difference in the impact created by him and personalities like LeBron and Mike. Young children have access to people like him as they can approach him easily by going into a public building. It is important that children have aspiring figures that they can interact with in their daily lives.



 



 

The comment section mostly agreed with all the points. @TeacherJenn2013 believed in the message and power of representation and wrote, "This is amazing! All kids need to see someone who is like them in a role they can achieve. Thank you for being accessible to those who need you!" @LizBC1908 further clarified her point and commented, "I agree with you but my point is why can’t they aspire to do both? I wanted to be a teacher and a doctor when I was growing up. I made my dreams of becoming both happen."



 

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