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Man reveals the 'oldest private investigator trick' and ways to outsmart it

Explore the 'oldest PI trick' used to gather information, and learn savvy ways to outsmart private investigators in this eye-opening video.

Man reveals the 'oldest private investigator trick' and ways to outsmart it
Cover Image Source: TikTok/@keeneyepi

Private investigators are like modern-day detectives who work independently to solve mysteries, find hidden information, and uncover the truth for individuals, businesses, and legal cases. Josh (@keeneyepi), who claims to be a private investigator, shares a warning with others about what he calls the "oldest PI trick in the book." In a video posted on July 13, he cautions viewers about a typical tactic surveillance investigators use to ascertain if someone is at home. According to Josh, these investigators might pretend to be looking for a lost pet and knock on your door. When you open the door, they achieve their goal - getting proof that someone is home and obtaining a visual of your face.

Image Source: TikTok/@keeneyepi
Image Source: TikTok/@keeneyepi

 

To help viewers protect themselves, Josh offers strategic measures to thwart potential investigators. He suggests asking the supposed pet owner specific details about their missing pet, as a genuine owner should know these and show real distress. If the stranger lingers in the area after being questioned, it could be a red flag that they might not be searching for a pet but instead tailing you. In such cases, involving the police might not be practical, as observing random houses from public roads is legally allowed for private investigators.

To counter this tactic, Josh proposes two options, saying, "You can either stay at home all day and if you don't want to do that, you can go somewhere where there are 'no trespassing' signs, and then call the police if they follow you there 'cause that would be illegal."

Image Source: TikTok/@keeneye
Image Source: TikTok/@keeneyepi

 

Since its posting, the video has garnered over 355,500 views, attracting a significant audience to the comment section, where viewers share their thoughts and opinions on the subject. The video's popularity reflects the importance of the information provided by Josh, resonating with many who seek to protect themselves from potential surveillance investigators and their deceptive tactics. @rosephoenix911 commented, "I'm a millennial. I don't answer the door for anyone."

@brianbushway, shared a similar stance, saying, "Jokes on you. If I'm not expecting company, I don't answer the door. My own family has been turned away because they didn't call first." Most users insisted that they would not open the door under most circumstances. @pappydapimp commented, "Knocking on my door is almost as bad as calling my phone instead of texting," to which Josh replied, "Didn't say this was gonna catch ya. Just said it was the oldest in the book. Knocking works great in rural states."

Image Source: TikTok/@semicolonexpected
Image Source: TikTok/@semicolonexpected

 

Image Source: TikTok/@mattymcmattface
Image Source: TikTok/@mattymcmattface

 

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment outlook for private detectives and investigators indicates a projected 6 percent growth from 2021 to 2031, which is similar to the average rate for all occupations. Over the next decade, around 3,700 job openings per year are expected in this field. The majority of these openings will arise from the need to replace workers who move to other careers or retire from the workforce. Till May 2021, the median annual wage for private detectives and investigators was $59,380. To become a private detective or investigator, most individuals typically need to have a high school diploma and several years of work experience. Additionally, in most states, obtaining a license is a mandatory requirement for practicing in this profession.

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