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Job applicant ghosts the company that made a job offer $15k less than their current pay

The applicant got offered a job that was less than their current position and asked to switch to working from the office.

Job applicant ghosts the company that made a job offer $15k less than their current pay
Representative Cover Image Source: (L) Pexels | cottonbro studio; (R) Reddit | u/princessgoulash

In the process of job hunting and employment, negotiations can be filled with expectations, professionalism and mutual respect. Yet, what happens when a promising job offer turns into a disappointment? Reddit user u/princessgoulash shared their story on Subreddit r/antiwork, recalling an encounter with a job offer that left them with no choice but to respond with silence.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alex Green
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alex Green

The job candidate prefaced the tale with the acknowledgment that their actions might not receive universal approval: "Ok so I'm actually expecting to get a little hate for this because you know, just cause some people to treat you like a **** in the career world doesn't mean you should stoop to their level. That being said, I did it anyway. Whoops." The story then unfolds as the individual finds themselves in the extraordinary position of receiving three interview requests simultaneously, a rare occurrence in the current job market. The first company seemed like a perfect match. They navigated the interview process swiftly with full transparency about their current salary. From the start, the cards were on the table, and all seemed well.

However, the situation took a disheartening turn when the company extended an offer letter that was at least $15,000 less per year than their current salary, with the added requirement of returning to an office environment. This abrupt change left them irritated and somewhat offended, given the significant investment of time they had made in the process. They made an attempt to negotiate, but the response from the company was far from satisfactory. Rather than engaging in an extended negotiation or expressing their dissatisfaction directly, they opted for a different course of action: ghosting. "So I did the mature, rational thing and just ghosted them. Really, it was because I didn't want to waste any more time than I already had."

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Edmond Dantès
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Edmond Dantès

What followed was a surprising and relentless pursuit by the company's recruiter. Daily calls, texts and emails persisted for over a week, leading the applicant to block the recruiter's number eventually. The company even resorted to having office personnel attempt to reach out by phone, but their caller ID foiled their efforts. The story of this unconventional response struck a chord with fellow Reddit users, sparking discussions and expressions of support. u/grated_t****s questioned the company's expectations stating, "How stupid are these people? How stupid do they expect you to be? You explained that you currently have a job that pays 15k more and is WFH. What did they expect you to do? Take their offer?"

u/SmartyMcPants4Life applauded their actions, emphasizing that the company's unprofessionalism justified the decision: "I think you did the exact right thing. They were so disrespectful. They did not deserve a professional response since they were unprofessional from the beginning and wasted your time with their BS." This individual's narrative is an intriguing case study of how individuals in the contemporary job market may react when presented with a job offer that falls short of their expectations. While some may view ghosting as an unprofessional choice, in this specific instance, it was a strategic decision to avoid further entanglement with a company that had demonstrated a lack of respect for the candidate's experience and requirements.

Image Source: Reddit | u/Salcha_00
Image Source: Reddit | u/Salcha_00
Image Source: Reddit | u/Uragami
Image Source: Reddit | u/Uragami

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