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Jerry Springer’s death has people confessing they loved to 'fall sick' and skip school to watch his show

'He's irreplaceable and his loss hurts immensely, but memories of his intellect, heart, and humor will live on,' said his family friend.

Jerry Springer’s death has people confessing they loved to 'fall sick'  and skip school to watch his show
NEW YORK - OCTOBER 11: TV Host Jerry Springer celebrates the taping of "The Jerry Springer Show" 20th anniversary show at Military Island, Times Square on October 11, 2010 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

Not many people transition from a career in politics to one in television. But Jerry Springer did it. He was the mayor of Cincinnati and later became the host of "The Jerry Springer Show." He set a new standard for meretricious and sensationalism through his show. It even changed what to expect from a show of this kind. On April 27, his death was confirmed by Jene Galvin, a close family friend and executive producer of Springer’s podcast. Many people on the internet also mourned his loss and reminisced about their memories of watching him on TV. They revealed how they would watch his show when they took a sick day from school, as reported by Huff Post.



 

 

While one Twitter user @Sydney Leathers wrote, "RIP jerry springer I loved watching people beat each other’s a** on your show when I'd stay home sick from school as a child." Another @WUTangKids tweeted, "Oh no…RIP Jerry Springer …thank you for giving 90s kids something to watch when we stayed home "sick" from school." @squiliamfancy tweeted, "RIP Jerry Springer. He was there every sick day growing up." While @NerdNash wrote, "He held kids down a lot of suspended days home from school. A lot of days on punishment when mom took the game out of the room."



 

 



 

 

His loved ones also remembered him, as Galvin said in his statement to PEOPLE, "Jerry's ability to connect with people was at the heart of his success in everything he tried whether that was politics, broadcasting or just joking with people on the street who wanted a photo or a word." "He's irreplaceable and his loss hurts immensely, but memories of his intellect, heart, and humor will live on." As the statement continued, "Funeral services and a memorial gathering are currently being developed. To remember Jerry, the family asks that in lieu of flowers, you consider following his spirit and make a donation or commit to an act of kindness to someone in need or a worthy advocacy organization. As he always said, 'Take care of yourself, and each other.'"



 

 



 

 

Springer was aware of the content and the impact of his show. According to CNN, he once said in an interview, “I think [the show is] silly, crazy and has no redeeming social value other than an hour of escapism,” he said in 2010. “There is never anything on our show that hasn’t been on the front pages of newspapers in America. The only difference is that the people on my show aren’t famous.” “It’s a show about craziness,” he added. “I know that going in every day.” He also spoke of the controversy around his show, as he once told WLWT, “I think that’s fair. I think this show probably does offend some people and they should protest. That’s okay. That’s America. That’s why god gave us a remote control.”



 

 



 



 

 

It is because of his realistic approach to life and his contributions to television that he is remembered by actors such as Marlon Wayans. Wayans had once appeared on Springer's show. “So glad we got to do this classic episode with you in Chicago,” Wayans wrote in a Facebook post and even added a clip of the show. “Rest well buddy. We will all be chanting JERRY! JERRY! JERRY!” the actor added.



 

 

Springer is survived by his daughter, Katie Springer. 

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