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Japanese technology that quickly warned residents of incoming earthquake leaves people wonderstruck

People are shocked, as well as in awe that an active technology was able to save lives in Japan before a massive earthquake rattled the country.

Japanese technology that quickly warned residents of incoming earthquake leaves people wonderstruck
Cover Image Source: Twitter| @levandov_2

Technology is building at its best and the advancements have aided human life and living to a large extent. Japan’s technology has been greatly developed and is among the prominent features of the country. Their recent technology to predict and warn residents about incoming earthquakes in a jiffy has left people stunned and applauding. @levandov_2 posted a video on Twitter where she shared how she received a notification regarding an earthquake that rattled the country on the New Year and was able to protect herself and take precautionary measures. The Japan Meteorological Agency shared that the system was designed to aid residents and protect them from earthquakes taking place.

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Jack Sparrow
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Jack Sparrow

An earthquake hit Japan on New Year’s Day and while it did cause some damage, the majority of residents were prepared for the outcome and took the necessary precautions. The agency provides people with notifications regarding the earthquake in advance. The system works in a way that notifies people as soon as the earthquake begins so they have valuable seconds to prepare themselves for the tremors. The woman in the video was chatting with her viewers presumably making casual content online. She immediately saw the notification on her phone and said, “Oh, there’s an earthquake.” 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Lisa Fotios
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Lisa Fotios

The woman added, “Oh, it’s a big one,” and immediately went and took shelter, leaving the camera to capture the tremors through the shaking doors. The New York Times reported that though the earthquake was quite major, it caused much less damage than it would have had the notifications not been sent. The agency did a fantastic job in cautioning residents. They even issued warnings about the level of the waves and said that it would be between 5 meters to 16 feet. In addition to these well-informed warnings, they also mentioned the possibility of aftershocks hours later. The agency’s systems were well-equipped, providing timely warnings to residents. Hours later, people were informed about the reduction of waves to 3 meters and most of the warnings were removed.

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Ahmed Akacha
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Ahmed Akacha

By the next day, all warnings had been lifted and residents were safe to carry on about their day. In addition to the agency’s warnings, other institutes and departments were able to take precautionary measures too. Trains were halted, important facilities were likely undamaged and the fire and other help departments were ready in case of any casualties. The earthquake, however, did leave some damage to certain people, electricity towers in certain areas were also affected and there were some fatalities too. Apart from that, the people trapped were evacuated.



 

 

People are stunned by Japan’s technology and the grave damage they were saved from. Several people commented on the woman’s video. @DatHandsomeJerk said, “Great and scary at the same time.” @Karitou1 said, “I was in the airport, and everyone’s devices started the alarm.” @RandyBTC2000 shared a comment on Twitter applauding the system. They said, “The unbelievable release of power that just happened here in Japan is quite the spectacle to watch. And I have to say the ingenuity of the Japanese people as far as the Earthquake Warning system and building codes is also impressive and has saved a lot of lives in this earthquake.”



 

 



 

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