NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Jane Goodall explains what we can learn from chimpanzees and it's a message the world needs to hear

Dr. Jane Goodall explains how chimpanzees are capable of more love and empathy in comparison to humans.

Jane Goodall explains what we can learn from chimpanzees and it's a message the world needs to hear
Cover Image Source: Instagram | @museumofscience

Humans have introduced brilliant innovations into the world in their pursuit to establish themselves as the most superior creatures in the world. However, they often miss out on some core values showcased by creatures around them. Therefore, humans must stay in tandem with the beings around them, treat them with respect as well as gratitude and learn vital life lessons from them. Dr. Jane Goodall firmly believes in such a connection, as she explains in her video with the Museum of Science, things that humans can learn from chimpanzees. Goodall is a world-renowned primatologist and anthropologist known for her work with chimpanzees.

Image Source: YouTube/Museum of Science
Image Source: Instagram | @museumofscience

In the video, she explains in detail the important life lessons humans can gain from chimpanzees and incorporate into our lives. The first thing she brings to light is their ability to attain "reconciliation after conflict." On the contrary, humans struggle with this ability, carrying grudges after decades of war. Goodall added, "We fight wars. We have conflicts all over the world today."

Image Source: YouTube/Museum of Science
Image Source: Instagram | @museumofscience

She then goes on to compliment the mother-children relationship that exists in chimpanzees. The anthropologist calls the treatment meted out by mothers to their children "exemplary," as they give their offspring unconditional support. In the case of humans, she finds that there is more separation. She gives her own example of how she missed out on a relationship with her father because of war.


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Planetary Guardians (@planetarygdns)


 

Humans often prioritize things other than their kids, while chimpanzees don't. In today's world, humans are more concentrated on themselves rather than on making this world better for their children. According to Goodall, "If a child feels supported, that makes all the difference."

Image Source: SYDNEY, NSW - JULY 14: A Chimpanzee jumps at a glass screen as primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall holds a press conference at Taronga Zoo July 14, 2006 in Sydney, Australia. Dr Goodall visited the zoo to raise awareness of the plight of wild Chimpanzees. The zoo's colony of Chimps includes several family groups, and three of the oldest Chimpanzees in zoos. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)
Image Source: A Chimpanzee jumps at a glass screen as primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall holds a press conference at Taronga Zoo July 14, 2006 in Sydney, Australia. Dr Goodall visited the zoo to raise awareness of the plight of wild Chimpanzees. The zoo's colony of Chimps includes several family groups and three of the oldest Chimpanzees in zoos. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)

Throughout her career, Goodall has supported the view that humans and chimpanzees can benefit from each other. She has rejected notions that chimpanzees are different and inferior to humans. Her opinion is that there are a lot of similarities and a huge scope for learning from each other. In her interview with Vox, she shared that the biggest achievement of her career has been blurring the line between humans and the animal kingdom. She has proven that chimpanzees have the same capabilities as humans. One fateful day, she observed chimpanzees making tools and broke the myth that man is the only toolmaker in the world. In her own words, this was the "turning point," as after this, people became more open to the fact that "we are not the only beings on the planet with personalities, minds and emotions."

Image Source: 041816 03: Scientist Jane Goodall studies the behavior of a chimpanzee during her research February 15, 1987 in Tanzania. (Photo by Penelope Breese/Liaison)
Image Source: Scientist Jane Goodall studies the behavior of a chimpanzee during her research on February 15, 1987, in Tanzania. (Photo by Penelope Breese/Liaison)

Moreover, in her opinion, "there are some ways that animals are highly intelligent in ways that we certainly would be completely stupid." Their aggression is a result of impulses. Their 'violence' can never become evil like humans. She explained, "I think only humans are capable of evil. Because to me, evil is not just responding to an aggressive impulse (which is what chimps do), but sitting deliberately in cold blood and planning the destruction of another human being or planning a war."

Image Source: Dame Jane Goodall, English UN Messenger of Peace, primatologist, ethnologist and anthropologist pictured before a lecture in Edinburgh. She was best-known for her study of chimpanzee social and family life in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania, for 45 years, and for founding the Jane Goodall Institute. (Photo by Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images)
Image Source: Dame Jane Goodall, English UN Messenger of Peace, primatologist, ethnologist and anthropologist pictured before a lecture in Edinburgh. She was best known for her study of chimpanzee social and family life in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania, for 45 years and for founding the Jane Goodall Institute. (Photo by Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images)

Today, she is happy that there is more acceptance that humans are part of the animal kingdom and not superior to it. Though there is still some resistance to the idea that humans and animals are equals, the progress elates her. She hopes that the world reaches a place where humans finally understand that they are sharing this planet with animals and do not have any right to hurt and torture them for their own gain.


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Museum of Science (@museumofscience)


 

More Stories on Scoop