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'It’s going to crank up the wrong people': Woman calls cops on one-man Black Lives Matter protest

A Florida man was standing on the corner in broad daylight holding a sign in support of Black lives earlier this month when the woman called the cops out of fear that he would incite a riot.

'It’s going to crank up the wrong people': Woman calls cops on one-man Black Lives Matter protest
Cover Image Source: TikTok/Shane Meyers

Nationwide debates over whether the police need to be defunded or reformed seem to be bringing all the racist white women to the playground at an unprecedented—or perhaps, previously undocumented—rate. By proving every day that they've been at liberty to call the cops for literally the batshit craziest of reasons for far too long, the Susans and Karens of the country are pretty much making a case against themselves and the supposedly "bad apples" in law enforcement. In one recent incident, a Florida woman called the police on a lone white Black Lives Matter protestor because she feared it would "crank up the wrong people." 



 

Shane Meyers, a Florida native, was standing on the corner in broad daylight holding a sign in support of Black lives earlier this month when the woman called the cops out of fear that he would incite a riot. Yep, the racists aren't even trying to hide it anymore. A video posted by Meyers on TikTok begins with footage of a rapper driving by praising him for his efforts. It then cuts to him being surrounded by the local Karen and two cops who don't make much of an effort to hide who's side they're on.



 

 

"I said to him, I said, 'Excuse me, but could you please not put that sign out because it's going to crank up the wrong people,'" the woman is heard telling the police officers. "I don't want to be driving and have bullets shot at me because they're upset because you started it." The cop replies that Meyers is "unfortunately" allowed to stand outside with a sign that says whatever he wants to say. The woman shoots the officer a look of such disappointment at this point that I'm low-key impressed he didn't change his stance.



 

 

"I'm just upset because I don't want to get caught if they start rioting because of your sign," she laments, once again referring to the mysterious "they" whom she believes will break the peace in her supposedly Floridian utopia. "I'm also upset because Black and brown lives are at risk every single day in this country," Meyers points out, which immediately invokes a classic "All lives matter" response from the woman and the police officer. "Everybody's life's at risk," they both state almost as if they'd been practicing their lines for quite some time.



 

 

Unfortunately for the Karen in this incident, her trying to disrupt one man's peaceful protest only drew more protestors to the scene on subsequent days. After the video went viral on social media, Meyers put out a call to his community to join him in protesting against police brutality and racism. Come protest with us on 441 & Forest Hill everyday! Let's keep fighting this fight and show Karens that we won't be silent just because snowflakes don't like our message. Off the computer and on to the streets. If you're not able to make it, consider making a recurring donation to an anti-racist org, he wrote on Facebook.



 

 



 

 

His call drew in more and more protestors every day, all of them lining up on the same street corner with Black Lives Matter signs. Reflecting on the incredible show of support in an Instagram post earlier this week, Meyers wrote: After a hectic week, this is the photo that finally made me break down. It’s been 7 days since I first protested on this street corner alone - and the movement has grown every day since. Each day, I pull up to scenes like the one pictured here, with dozens of people on the same street corner. Folks who can’t protest with us, but bring us water, snacks, ponchos, and umbrellas anyway. Passing drivers who pound on their horn or throw a fist in the air to show support. All of this is happening in an affluent suburb best known for its polo, dressage, and hunter jumping scene. I never expected to see this in my hometown, but damn am I proud.



 

 

I’m not sharing this to congratulate myself for my role in a local movement. Rather, I want to share a simple call to action. If you live somewhere that doesn’t already have a protest, start one. You’re probably living in a place that needs it most. A cliché that rings true: if you stand for what’s right, you won’t be alone. Within 24 hours of my first protest, I received countless messages of support from Minneapolis, New York, and LA. Just a day later, the street corner was filled with other protesters. The same will follow in your area, he continued. Lastly, I want to add that this is a marathon. When #BLM is no longer trending, let’s not forget their names. Let’s keep fighting to right the injustices that black Americans face every day. Let’s keep making noise on street corners across the country. Hope to see even more of you out here right now, 6 pm on weekdays and 11 am on weekends. Let’s keep fighting.



 

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