NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

People are sharing 10 life-saving tips that everyone should know about and it's an eye-opener

Discover ten crucial life-saving tips shared by people, a valuable resource for enhancing safety and well-being in our everyday lives.

People are sharing 10 life-saving tips that everyone should know about and it's an eye-opener
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Anthony

Important life-saving advice

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Levi Damasceno
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Levi Damasceno

Many times as we go through life, we come across life-threatening situations and we're not quite sure how to respond to them. In such scenarios, sometimes common sense and some basic knowledge can go a long way in ensuring our survival or minimizing injury. Something as simple as knowing not to put water on oil in a pan that has caught fire prevents a potential house fire. Reddit user, u/Yell0w_Submarine seemed to be curious about what important information could potentially save their lives and posed the question to the community.  

1. Be careful with microwaves

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mike Bird
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mike Bird

Most amateur hobbyists know this already but, do NOT mess with the electrical systems of microwaves unless you are 110% certain the capacitor has been discharged safely. Those things can hold enough energy to instantly kill the shit out of you. u/Bendenius. Also, if you need to use parts of a microwave to create a wood-burning project, it’s because you’re using the microwave bits to bypass an extremely important safety feature built into the electrical system of your house. You will fry yourself so badly that there will be no recovery and no option other than cremation. Just don’t do it. u/bella_68

2. Avoid going into confined spaces

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Filipe Delgado
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Filipe Delgado

If you find someone unconscious in a confined space don’t go in. u/New_Classic_90.  Yep. Was a lifeguard and had a coworker almost die due to chlorine gas from a bag getting wet. He went into the pump room and stopped talking to me, so I turned the corner to see what was going on, saw him slumped over, and went in to get him. I was barely able to drag him out before I passed out and we both died. Luckily him opening the door had let it vent just enough to save us. u/AstroWorldSecurity 

3. Not relying solely on a car jack 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Вениамин Курочкин
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Вениамин Курочкин

A jack alone is not enough. Your life is worth more than the $0.005 gasket holding the hydraulic pressure. Always use 3 points of contact. Jack, jackstand, and a wheel under the car. Once you’ve raised and secured jt, before you get under it, shake the whole car. Try to get it to fall. If it doesn’t, as it shouldn’t, check and recheck your jack and stands. Only then get under the car. And have a spotter that can call 911 within earshot. If they need to go inside for a bathroom break, get your ass out from under the car until they get back. u/r4x

4. Don't catch a falling knife

Pexels | Photo by Daniel Eliashevsky
Pexels | Photo by Daniel Eliashevsky

A falling knife has no handle. Not life-saving, but worth knowing. u/Si_the_chef. So true. the first chef I worked with way back when dropped a chef’s knife and tried to deflect it with her left leg. We had to get a tourniquet on and get her to a hospital bc she hit a big artery and almost bled out. Not even hands were involved. Just get out of the way of a falling knife. u/TheNetworkIsFrelled

5. Protecting eyes and ears

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

Wear protective glasses when trimming the yard, cutting wood, etc. Your eyes will thank you. u/70Cuda440. Ear protection too. It’s amazing how many landscapers I see with no PPE on. Maybe it’s a looked down upon within their circle, but as a homeowner who runs the mower, trimmer, and blower only once a week, I can’t fathom the hearing loss the guys have that do it all day for 5-7 days a week. u/beerguy_etcetera

6. Staying away from tornadoes 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ralph W. Lambrecht
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ralph W. Lambrecht

If a tornado looks like it isn’t moving, that’s because it’s moving toward you. u/Spenny_All_The_Way. I live in the Midwest. I’ve seen my fair share of tornadoes. Typically, it gets REALLY quiet right before a storm hits. And if you feel the pressure change in your ear all of a sudden. However, at that point, the tornado is already on top of you and you’re probably dead. People don’t take storms seriously enough. Especially tornadoes. u/Texas_Red_1959 

7. Floatation device when saving a drowning person

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Luca Nardone
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Luca Nardone

Keep a floatation device between you and a drowning person, even if they're smaller than you. Even if they look unconscious. Also, never stand near or under a suspended load. Ever. Never trust an electrical wire, been shocked a few times by things that definitely were supposed to be dead. In the woods, beware cheekos/widow makers, aka standing dead trees. Especially if you're cutting a tree near them. If your wife asks you how she looks in an outfit, she's the prettiest thing you've ever seen, honesty be damned. u/DungeonAssMaster

8. Wear a helmet 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | MIXU
Representative Image Source: Pexels | MIXU

Wear a helmet in case you need one. If you ask 'Should I be wearing one?' The answer is yes. u/Northatlanticiceman. The best you can get. The absolute best. I worked with a guy who bicycled to work and in his spare time and always wore a helmet. One day he was knocked over by a car while cycling - so hard that the helmet was broken to pieces. Yet he seemed okay when he gathered himself. The hospital found nothing wrong. A year later he dropped dead suddenly while taking a shower. We'll always wonder. u/Tall_Mickey 

9. Do not put your hand into a snowblower

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Lauren Hedges
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Lauren Hedges

If something gets stuck in a snowblower, do NOT put your hand in to get it out. The pressure of the lodged object creates stored energy in the spinners and will release and chop off whatever’s inside once the object is dislodged. Reddit. My dad did this. We had no idea what happened at first because he just came in and said, 'Kath, I'm going to the hospital', wrapped his finger in towels or something, and drove himself to the ER. Followed my mom outside after him and there was the snowblower halfway down the walkway and a trail of blood. u/ky-oh-tee

10. Swimming in heavy currents 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mali Maeder
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mali Maeder

Don’t underestimate water, good swimmers drown all the time. u/Ta-veren-. Jumped in a river with my buddies. Instantly realized that the current was way stronger than it looked. And I was barely able to keep up with the current at a normal swim pace. I'm a good swimmer and had to kick it into a pace that was not sustainable for a long time but I had to try and suddenly a BUNCH of locals came running over from a park and pulled us out. Then they pointed at a sign that said no swimming and I felt like an idiot. I walked right by it and didn't notice. It also had a warning for alligators and bull sharks. We were lucky to be helped so quickly. u/LargeWeinerDog

More Stories on Scoop