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Imagine Dragons' new documentary shines focus on mental health and importance of therapy

The film not only chronicles the band's rise to fame but also delves into the ongoing mental health journeys of its members.

Imagine Dragons' new documentary shines focus on mental health and importance of therapy
Image Source: Daniel Platzman, Dan Reynolds, Daniel Wayne Sermon, and Ben McKee of Imagine Dragons attend Variety's 2022 Hitmakers Brunch on December 03, 2022, in Los Angeles, California—Getty Images | Kevin Winter

Amid personal struggles and the pursuit of a fulfilling life, individuals are facing their inner battles. Recognizing the importance of supporting those with mental health challenges, the pop-rock band Imagine Dragons has taken a significant step by shedding light on mental health and therapy. Their latest documentary, "Imagine Dragons Live in Vegas," not only captures the band's journey to stardom but also delves into the ongoing mental health experiences of its members. This Hulu concert documentary serves as a compelling platform to raise awareness and foster understanding surrounding mental well-being.

Image Source: Drummer Daniel Platzman, bassist Ben McKee, guitarist Wayne Sermon and frontman Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons attend the sixth annual Tyler Robinson Foundation Rise Up gala at Wynn Las Vegas on September 06, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Bryan Steffy/Getty Images for Tyler Robinson Foundation)
Image Source: Drummer Daniel Platzman, bassist Ben McKee, guitarist Wayne Sermon and frontman Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons attend the sixth annual Tyler Robinson Foundation Rise Up Gala at Wynn Las Vegas on September 06, 2019, in Las Vegas, Nevada—Getty Images | Bryan Steffy

"I think it's a big part of just the natural message of Imagine Dragons," frontman Dan Reynolds said in an interview with ABC News. "You know, lyrically, I'm always just writing, like, a diary, and that's been a big part of my life, is mental health, and learning to live with depression." The lead vocalist who previously shouted out his therapist onstage at one of his shows, opened up about the importance of talking about mental health without stigma attached.

"I've had multiple therapists who have come to shows throughout the years," the 35-year-old singer-songwriter said. "I think it is really important for people to talk about it in all aspects, whether you're famous, whether you're an athlete, I think it's really important for kids to see, 'Hey, just because I reached my goal -- my ultimate goal -- that doesn't mean that that's going to fix something.'"

Image Source: Drummer Daniel Platzman, keyboard/bassist Ben McKee, singer Dan Reynolds and lead guitarist Wayne Sermon of Imagine Dragons perform onstage during Coca-Cola Music at the NCAA March Madness Music Festival at Hemisfair on March 31, 2018, in San Antonio, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/Getty Images for Turner )
Image Source: Drummer Daniel Platzman, keyboard/bassist Ben McKee, singer Dan Reynolds and lead guitarist Wayne Sermon of Imagine Dragons perform onstage during Coca-Cola Music at the NCAA March Madness Music Festival at Hemisfair on March 31, 2018, in San Antonio, Texaș—Getty Images | Rick Kern

He continued, "Having a therapist has saved my life and so I think when something saves your life, you're gonna talk about it." The band has even brought in topics of mental health like depression into their songs like their 2012 hit song, "Demons" with lyrics like "Don't get too close, it's dark inside." Lead guitarist Wayne Sermon revealed that he's read a review that likened going to an Imagine Dragons concert to going to a church with Reynolds as the pastor. "I feel like that capsulated very well just, like, the healing and the positiveness that comes out of a show," Sermon said.



 

With over six albums and 15 years of experience, the band says they're just getting started. "I think we're still hungry," Reynolds said. "We're always working on music and feel like there are songs to be written and places to go, and new cities and cultures to experience. And again, I feel like when that day comes, when we don't feel that, I think that'll be the end of the band."

Wayne Sermon, Daniel Platzman, Dan Reynolds, and Ben McKee of Imagine Dragons attend the 2022 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on November 20, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images for dcp)
Image Source: Wayne Sermon, Daniel Platzman, Dan Reynolds, and Ben McKee of Imagine Dragons attend the 2022 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on November 20, 2022, in Los Angeles, California—Getty Images | Amy Sussman

He told PEOPLE that to celebrate the 10th anniversary of their debut album they released a repacked version titled "Night Visions (Expanded Edition)." Reynolds said the album "changed his life forever" and let him reflect on some personal experiences he was going through at the time of its creation. "It's hard for me to even recall many memories during that time," he explained. "I think I was shell-shocked to the extreme. I was a Mormon missionary who had just gotten home from the mission and was very lost, losing my faith and religion and kind of scrambling."



 

Then, suddenly I was married and had a child and was broke." Fortunately for him and his bandmates, things turned around. "It was like, 'When you have a show, bring the money, and we'll go to Trader Joe's and buy some groceries for the week. And then when I have a show, vice versa,'" he recalled. "It was a scary time and then suddenly, the band just blew up so quickly and it changed everything for me."

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