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Thanks to pollution drop The Himalayas are now visible from 125 miles away after decades

India's pandemic lockdown has given way to a dramatic improvement in air quality in recent weeks resulting in this phenomenon.

Image Source: Getty Images (representative)
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With the novel coronavirus forcing humans to retreat into their homes, we've been seeing a drastic change in the planet we've polluted to near destruction. Parts of the world have reported a significant improvement in air quality as roads lay empty, social media raved about the famous Venice canals clearing up to reveal its fascinating secrets, and wildlife made headlines by venturing out into cities. While these unusual sights have prompted many to think about our impact on the planet, the Himalayan mountain range has now joined the conversation in a majestic fashion.

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For the first time in over decades, the towering peaks of the Himalayas have become visible to people in the northern Indian state of Punjab that's more than 100 miles away from the mountain range. According to CNN, the country's pandemic lockdown has given way to a dramatic improvement in air quality in recent weeks after cars came off the road, industries shut down, and airlines canceled flights. This phenomenon has enabled Indians in the city of Jalandhar and the surrounding area to view the mountain range from their rooftops. Many shared pictures of the stunning view from their homes on social media and it truly is a sight to behold.

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Former Indian cricketer, Harbhajan Singh, tweeted a view of the Dhauladar range from his rooftop, writing: Never seen Dhauladar range from my home rooftop in Jalandhar..never could imagine that’s possible..clear indication of the impact the pollution has done by us to Mother Earth... This is the view. Twitter user Manjit K Kang wrote: For the first time in almost 30 years (I) could clearly see the Himalayas due to India's lockdown clearing air pollution. Just amazing.

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In a recently published report, India's Central Pollution Control Board stated that Delhi saw up to a 44% reduction in PM10—a standard that measures airborne particulates 10 micrometers or smaller in diameter—air pollution levels on the first day of its restrictions. The Central Pollution Control Board added that, in total, 85 cities across the country saw less air pollution in the first week of the nationwide lockdown. Meanwhile, in Jalandhar—which sits more than 100 miles from the Himalayas—the air quality has been measured as "good" on the country's national index for 16 of the 17 days since the nationwide lockdown was imposed.

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To put that into perspective, the same 17-day period last year failed to register a single day of "good" air quality. Moreover, Jalandhar only saw three "good" air quality days in the first 17 days of March this year. Check out some of the stunning images of the Himalayan mountain range posted by Punjab residents:

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