NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Apple iPhone forced to change charger in Europe as EU approves USB-C connectors for all phones

The European Commission estimates that a common charger would save about 250 million euros ($247.3 million) for consumers.

Apple iPhone forced to change charger in Europe as EU approves USB-C connectors for all phones
Cover Image Source: Customers line up at an Apple Store to pick up their orders of the new iPhone 14 on September 16, 2022 in Wuhan. Hubei, China. (Photo by Getty Images)

European lawmakers on Tuesday voted to introduce a new law that would require electronic devices to use a common charger. According to Reuters, the reform—which is the first of its kind in the world and passed by an overwhelming majority in the European Parliament—will require all mobile phones, tablets and cameras sold in the European Union to be equipped with a USB Type-C charging port by the end of 2024. The new rules affect companies like Apple, which has only equipped its newer iPads and MacBooks with USB-C ports.



 


Apple is expected to be the most affected by the new rule among the big providers of electronic devices to European customers. However, analysts believe the impact could be positive if the company encourages shoppers to buy its new gadgets instead of ones without USB-C. Meanwhile, Alex Agius Saliba, the EU lawmaker who steered the reform through the EU assembly, assured in a news conference that old chargers will not be outlawed as doing so would have a disproportionate impact on consumers and the environment. Saliba added that the change is expected to lead to a gradual phase-out of older products. "This future-proof law allows for the development of innovative charging solutions in the future, and it will benefit everyone—from frustrated consumers to our vulnerable environment," he said in a press release, reports CNBC.



 


The reform, which has been more than 10 years in the making, also covers e-readers, earbuds and other technologies and will therefore have an impact on Samsung, Huawei and other device makers as well, analysts said. It will also apply to laptops from 2026, giving manufacturers who don't already use USB-C longer to adapt. In the past, Apple has warned that the proposal would hurt innovation and create a mountain of electronics waste. However, the European Commission estimates that a common charger would save about 250 million euros ($247.3 million) for consumers.



 


Ben Wood, the chief analyst at CCS Insight, stated that in light of the new law, it is now "inevitable" that the iPhone 15 (which is expected to release in 2023) will have a USB-C port. "This is a victory for common sense. Although Apple has a huge installed base of lightning cable-powered devices, the ubiquity of USB-C across all consumer electronics products means that harmonizing on USB-C makes perfect sense," Wood said, reports The Guardian. He added that he expects Apple to adopt the USB-C port in the U.K. and globally.



 

"Irrespective of whether the UK government mandates the move to USB-C or not, UK consumers will get the technology by default. It will make no sense for consumer electronics manufacturers to offer devices with anything else," he said. Meanwhile, although the European Commission has also been mandated by lawmakers to assess the possible regulation of wireless charging, an EU official revealed that no decision has been made on the matter yet as the technology is not yet mature.

More Stories on Scoop