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Employee is inspiring everyone with a phenomenal way to help with the Monday blues

Tired of working odd hours and resenting the office culture, employee switches to a more convenient working model.

Employee is inspiring everyone with a phenomenal way to help with the Monday blues
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | energepic.com, Reddit | u/memorable_client

After a long and exhaustive work week, we usually find time to do the things we love only during weekends. That is mainly because, for most people, monotonous work, boring corporate culture and forced interactions diminish their interest in their jobs. Even those with careers they love, sometimes tend to feel the pressure of a tiresome environment and look forward to the weekend. Reddit user u/memorable_client found a solution that relieves them of the Monday blues and inspires them to start the work week with full spirit. They posted their story on the community, "Switched to the 4-day work week and it feels great! and people were inspired by their approach."

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antonu Shkraba
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antoni Shkraba

The 32-year-old European based in Paris began their post mentioning that they have been working since the age of 23 and that they hated everything about it. "The fake socialization, the people, the pressure to work overtime, the office culture, the feeling of being a mindless drone, etc," wrote the employee. Talking about how they felt uncomfortable in the work setting they said, "I have often found myself in trouble because I never wanted to eat lunch with my colleagues, I never wanted to be a part of the 'team', I never participated in any after work activities. They always thought of me as a weirdo," and added, "The only thing I've ever wanted regarding work is to do the job and get the f**k off on time." Notwithstanding the stress that they feel when they have to start every week, they come up with a convenient plan.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | fauxels
Representative Image Source: Pexels | fauxels

"I finally registered myself as an entrepreneur and now I work for a company 4 days a week/8 hours a day. I have my hourly rate and the tax I pay is much less than when I was employed (because now I don't pay for the social services such as pension etc)," said the entrepreneur and added, "In the end, I get more money than before which is what matters to me." Feeling thrilled about this life-changing switch, they said, "I have never been happier! I have a three-day weekend and every Friday I wake up and go for a run!" and added, "I love running, but somehow now I especially love it on Fridays. I don't dread Mondays anymore."

"Other than that, I do my job, I leave on time and if for some reason they need me to stay longer, that will cost more, although I was specific about not wanting to work after 18:30. I put all my hours in the invoice at the end of the month," wrote the entrepreneur. Mentioning the perks of this decision they said that they don't have to listen to things like, "Do overtime and take a day off when we decide on it," and added, "I want money, not your permission to take a day off." They finally recommended the audience to consider switching to a self-employed work model with a 4-day work week.

Image Source: Reddit | u/SmellyBotty
Image Source: Reddit | u/SmellyBotty
Image Source: Reddit | u/ughit
Image Source: Reddit | u/ughit

While some people shared their similar experiences, many fancied such a stress-free work pattern. "100% agree. I'm in the UK and going 'self-employed' did wonders for my mental health and I would always encourage people to gain qualifications to enable them to work for themselves and not be an employee," commented u/huxberry73. "I wish I could do something like that. I'm just not sure what I could do like this. I'm also European, for the record," wrote u/OneOnOne6211.

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