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Dr. Fauci: 'With all due modesty, I think I'm pretty effective' *mic drop*

In an interview with 'CBS Evening News' anchor Norah O’Donnell, Dr. Anthony Fauci was incredibly candid about the ongoing pandemic, his work, and his home life.

Dr. Fauci: 'With all due modesty, I think I'm pretty effective' *mic drop*
Image Source: Senate Help Committee Holds Hearing On Safely Going Back To Work And School During Pandemic. WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 30. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

Perhaps the hottest man on the block right now is none other than Dr. Anthony Fauci, the star behind the United States' action plan to defeat the ongoing pandemic. Without a doubt, he is up against a fierce competitor: people who don't believe in science (yes, President Donald Trump included). Despite this, he's kept his cool and has done his best to make sure American citizens are well-informed and well-armed against the public health crisis. If anything, we will remember him as the man who tried his hardest to combat a narcissist orange to save a whole nation. In an interview with CBS Evening News anchor Norah O’Donnell, he revealed details about a potential vaccine, what it's like to work with the White House, and what life is like at home.

 



 

Let's start right off the bat with his banger, shall we? In the recent past, Dr. Fauci has had to navigate a lot of flak. Not only does he have to go to war against anti-maskers and the President, but he's also dodging criticism from those on the Left who claim he is unable to stand up to Trump. Despite balancing this thin line pretty well, many have speculated that with the way this pandemic is going, he may no longer be employed with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases much longer. He argued, however, he doesn't see himself going anywhere any time soon.

 



 

"I don’t see any termination within the near future because I judge [my career] by my energy and my effectiveness," the public health expert affirmed. "And right now, with all due modesty, I think I’m pretty effective. I certainly am energetic. And I think everybody thinks I’m doing more than an outstanding job. I have a wife with incredibly good judgment, who will probably give me the signal when it’s time to step down. But I don’t think we’re anywhere near that right now." Please, dear God, let it not be anywhere near that time. The country's already sinking and the last thing we want is to see the only voice of reason left abandon ship.

 



 

Since he's staying (at least for now), it's obvious that he'll continue dealing quite a lot with the President. Dr. Fauci was therefore very explicit about his relationship with Trump. He explained, "You know, it’s complicated. Because in some respects I have a very good relationship with him. During the times that I was seeing him a fair amount, it was quite a collegial relationship. And in many respects, it probably still is, but I don’t see him very much anymore." That sounds an awful lot like how I describe my toxic ex-boyfriend. He refused to wear a mask too! (Though it was a different kind that I wish Trump's father had worn.)

 



 

Finally, the man of the hour dished about the possibilities of a vaccine hitting the market. "It was very good news that the New England Journal of Medicine reported that the Phase 1 trial substantial titers of neutralizing antibodies were induced, which is the gold standard for prediction of protection," he shared. "So that was a very good news story for the day. We’re going to start the Phase 3 trial in the third or fourth week of July. If all goes well and there aren’t any unanticipated bumps in the road, hopefully, we should know whether the vaccine is safe and effective by the end of this calendar year, or the beginning of 2021." Things might just look up, folks! Up, like market prices for the vaccine if our country doesn't step up its national health policy. Sigh.

 

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