NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Dad's sincere texts while trying to buy the right pads for his daughter are winning hearts

Tia Savva couldn't help but crack up as her father tried to navigate the feminine hygiene products aisle

Dad's sincere texts while trying to buy the right pads for his daughter are winning hearts
Image source: Facebook/tiasavva276

There's still a stigma surrounding periods and many men deliberately avoid learning anything about it but a father is winning hearts on the internet as he stepped out to buy feminine hygiene products for his daughter. He clearly was doing it for the first time and the conversation between him and his daughter has gone viral on Facebook. The screenshots of the text also highlighted men's lack of information on the menstrual cycle and feminine hygiene products. 

Menstrual bag with cotton tampons and sanitary pads - stock photo/Getty Images

 

Be it tampons, or pads, there are many brands, styles of products, scents, absorbency levels, and not to mention they're color-coded. Tia Savva had sent her to Tesco, a popular drugstore in the UK to pick up some pads. After heading to Tesco, he texts her. "Where are they?" She responds, "They're by all the deodorants and shampoos." He finds the pads and is confused by the many brands and products. He asks her which one she wants, and she says, "Always." Not realizing it's a brand, he adorably responds, "Always what??" Savva texts back, "No, they're called Always."



 

After he spots the brand, he realized, he's faced with a new problem. "Now, what. There's hundreds of them" He gets nervous as people are starting to stare at him but she urges him to calm down, telling him she needs the night ones, with purple packaging. She asks him to get scented ones with wings. He's confused again. "Wtf are wings," he asks, before innocently adding, "How will I know if they're scented. Will I have to smell them." Savva calmly responds, "It'll say so on the packet." He then reasons, "Ok smelling them would have been weird."



 

He then goes on, "Do you need any creams?" She's flabbergasted, and asks, "What in the f*ck. Why would I need creams??" He replies, "Because I thought ladies you ladies needed creams for after." She tells him to buy the pads and head home. He hen cutely replies, "Satan needs feeding. I'll bring you choc." The internet absolutely loved the interaction, lauding the man for attempting to learn about feminine hygiene products. The images were liked by more than 6K people. Many people tagged the men in their lives, either their partners, brothers, or husbands, in the hope they could learn to be like Savva's Dad. One person tagged another man and wrote, "Danny Graham, if you don’t send me a message saying Satan needs feeding, I don’t want it." Another commented, "What a lovely man, not many would do it."



 

If you've never been on a tampon run, there's a good chance that at some point in your life, you will have to, much like Savva's father. While there's a lot to learn, for novices, here are the most standard feminine hygiene products — Tampons, pads, and cups. Tampons are usually made from a blend of cotton, rayon, and other synthetic fibers and are absorbent. The tampons are inserted in the vaginal canal and have a string that makes its removal easy. Tampons need to be changed every 4-8 hours. Pads are absorbent and are often called sanitary napkins. They are worn in the underwear, with some having "wings," that help wrap around the edge of the underwear to hold it in place securely. The third option is the menstrual cup. They are flexible and are inserted into the vaginal canal. They conform to the user's body and collect menstrual fluid that can be disposed of later. The menstrual cup is reusable and can be worn for up to 12 hours.

There's a lot more to feminine hygiene products than just Tampons, pads, and cups. You can find more information on the subject on Mel Magazine.

More Stories on Scoop