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Children's rhyme book about body safety and consent is an incredible tool for parents

Kids only know what we as adults teach them. To raise a generation free of sexual trauma, we need to teach them what is okay and what isn't!

Children's rhyme book about body safety and consent is an incredible tool for parents
Cover Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait

Sex education is a topic that needs to be a part of every school curriculum so that kids are not misinformed. Just like too many cooks spoil the broth, too much information can make everything seem meaningless. That said, sex education is not only about physical intimacy. For our young hearts, it is about understanding the difference between a good touch and a bad touch. In a video posted on TikTok by Kaitlyn Renzi–who goes by @youcancallmekait–she reads an incredible nursery rhyme book that talks about good touch and bad touch. 

Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait
Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait

Renzi begins the video by introducing the book. She says, "'Only For Me' written by Michelle Derrig, illustrated by Nicole Mackenzie." The initial pages of the book talk about different body parts like our eyes, mouth, hands, legs and tummy. The rhyme then talks about what these body parts do. Then, she proceeds to the next page, where the main topic begins. She reads, "This is my bottom and bits that wee, they're very private and only for me. They have proper names that are good to use that way, no one gets confused." The book explains that while girls have a vulva and a vagina, boys have a penis and testicles. The next line talks about how no one can touch or see these parts and that the kid must say no. No matter how much the person insists, no means no.

Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait
Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait

The next pages talk about how irrespective of whether kids wear clothes or not, or if they call it a game or if they have the same parts, private parts aren't to be touched or seen by anyone else, not even when they offer treats or chocolates. Encouraging kids to speak up when facing unease, the book says, "And I can say no, whenever I like if someone's touch doesn't feel right. It might be a kiss or maybe a snuggle or stroking my body when having a cuddle."

The book also mentions how one can understand when they aren't comfortable. The mentioned signs and symptoms are butterflies in the tummy, wanting to visit the washroom, sweaty or sticky palms, heavy feet or just feeling sick with a racing heart.

Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait
Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait

And finally, the book encourages kids to speak up if something does happen. It asks kids to write down the names of five adults they trust and to tell them. It says that secrets about the body are not secrets forever and that spilling these "secrets" will not be terrible for you. The book urges kids to speak up and tell an adult and then leave it to the adult to deal with this. In case the adults fail to do anything about it, the book advises: "But if that person doesn't know what they must do, it's ok. I just need to tell someone new!"



 

Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait
Image Source: TikTok | @elleemmenohpee

The comment section was filled with love for the book, while many people were baring their souls and talking about how this book could have changed their lives. @ptoridactyll mentioned their own experiences and said, "'Safe secrets are NOT secrets forever,' that line got me. Took me 20 years to tell my mom about it. I'm turning 22." @tiffanymaegley had a doubt and asked, "Love this. But, how do you portray like bath time is okay or the doctor is okay? I'm new to this, my son is 2." @thisismymeatsuit commented, "I love this! I wish there was a more trans-friendly version, but the rest is perfect."

Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait
Image Source: TikTok | @youcancallmekait

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