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Career coach shares crucial tips on navigating career crisis at the age of 27 and it's truly helpful

A career coach candidly shares strategies for figuring out career crises at the age of 27 while also offering valuable insights into the job market.

Career coach shares crucial tips on navigating career crisis at the age of 27 and it's truly helpful
Cover Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl

Finding the right career can be a very daunting task. It only becomes more difficult with time and as one's age increases. Thankfully, career coach Stephanie Brown (@kiwilondongirl on TikTok) has shared a highly helpful video targeted at people who are 27 years old and having some thoughts about changing their career. The video has got 1.3 million views and 2116 comments so far. She begins the video by sharing how she has some very important advice for people who are 27 years old and thinking about changing their career. 

Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl
Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl

Brown says, "I've spoken to over 1200 people about their careers. There is one age that I have found to be the consistent age that people have a career crisis." According to her, 27 is the most common age at which people begin to change their perspectives about their careers and begin questioning their choices. Brown states that there is something very important to understand about this thought process that many people have when they are 27. It is the fact that very few people act on these feelings.

Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl
Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl

She explains how many people have such thoughts, but many refuse to make the change. Brown substantiates it by sharing how many people who are 40 would often wake up and be very confused about how they got there. She pinpoints that such people who are deeply unhappy and confused in their 40's very likely have the same thought to change their careers that they had when they were 27. She says, "If you are thinking about changing careers if you are not happy where you are right now in your career, make that change."

Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl
Image Source: TikTok | @kiwilondongirl
Image Source: TikTok | @geeooorrggiiee
Image Source: TikTok | @geeooorrggiiee
Image Source: TikTok | @sarhmeean
Image Source: TikTok | @sarhmeean

She warns people how refusing to act on such thoughts can result in them waking up 13 years into the future and regretting not doing anything about it. She concludes the clip by saying, "You cannot turn back the clock and make the changes." People on the platform found the expert's advice to be very helpful and shared their career journeys in the comments section. @shaeleighowbridge shared, "I was in pharmacy for ten years. Left at 24 and started a painting apprenticeship! Change it if you hate it!" @obiterocelot said, "At 27, I pulled a 180 from a career in law and taught myself programming. Now, I'm trying to encourage everyone to do the same."



 

With the job market growing more unpredictable with every passing day, it makes sense to look for a career that one is truly happy with. Another trend that seems to be emerging across industries amongst employees is "career cushioning." With most countries going into recession and corporations laying off employees at a massive scale, everyone's career is uncertain, according to Forbes. Thankfully, some LinkedIn users have adopted a different approach to this problem through career cushioning.

Career expert Catherine Fisher defines it as "taking actions to keep your options open and cushioning for whatever comes next in the economy and job market. Think of it like an insurance policy to set yourself up for success." It could vary from working extra hard to prevent getting laid off, according to BuzzFeed. People who take up this approach also begin looking for jobs well in advance. It's definitely something to look into, considering how competitive things are getting out there.

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