ANIMALS
FUNNY
INSPIRING
LIFESTYLE
NEWS
PARENTING
RELATIONSHIPS
SCIENCE AND NATURE
WHOLESOME
WORK
Contact Us Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Brené Brown explains the one key behavioral shift all leaders need to make in their lives

Today's leaders must take upon themselves the responsibility to tackle tough conversations head-on and with clarity.

Brené Brown explains the one key behavioral shift all leaders need to make in their lives
Cover Image Source: Brené Brown speaks onstage during weekend two, day two of Austin City Limits Music Festival at Zilker Park on October 09, 2021, in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)

Many leaders often struggle with having to talk to someone who is working under them or when they are in a position of superiority. More often than not, it's nothing personal. It is just the fact that these conversations can be potentially hurtful. Brené Brown touched upon this topic while talking to Gayle King on CBS Mornings a few years ago and had some insightful advice to share. During the interview, King asked the author and social researcher one simple question: "What is one behavior change that you think all leaders need?"


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Brené Brown (@brenebrown)


 

As per her website, Brown is "a researcher, storyteller, and (currently enraged) Texan who’s spent the past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame and empathy." Responding to King's question, she says words that cannot be easily forgotten. "It's going to be simple. Clear is kind, unclear is unkind," Brown statement. Her statement meant that clarity is crucial in any relationship, especially those in which you are in a position of power.

She added, "Stop avoiding the tough conversations because you think you are being polite or kind to people. That's not kind." Brown emphasizes the importance of talking about difficult topics. Assuming that you might come across as rude or impolite is not a good reason not to have a conversation about things that matter, especially if you are a leader.

A clip of the interview was shared by the Instagram page @mindsethub_ and @jessicaleavittouattara commented: "There's a very big difference between nice and kind. Most people thinking they are being nice are being unclear because it's not real. It's also important not to hide behind 'honesty' just to be rude and hurtful." @phyedlife wrote, "I'm a teacher and a parent and this applies to us too! I have seen so many teachers and parents get upset with a kid because they 'didn't do what I asked them to,' but they didn't give clear instructions. So, the kid gets in trouble because they don't know exactly what was being asked of them. Be clear and direct with your instruction and requests of kids." 


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Motivation | Dreamchasers (@mindsethub_)


 

@savicreations said, "Finally! Thank you for saying this. I would much prefer someone being clear and to the point, then letting me flounder and then accusing me of not being engaged in whatever relationship it is (work, personal)." @thollidayjohn commented, "Also, not doing this causes good employees to leave because they get tired of people being protected and not doing their jobs. You not helping anyone by trying to 'be their friend' you being their boss, they need true feedback and if they can't take it, then they shouldn't be in that industry."


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Brené Brown (@brenebrown)


 

Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston and a visiting professor in management at the University of Texas at Austin McCombs School of Business. She also wrote six books, all of which are #1 New York Times bestsellers. Moreover, she is a host of the original podcasts "Unlocking Us" and "Dare to Lead." Brown said on her website, "I believe that you have to walk through vulnerability to get to courage, therefore... embrace the suck. I try to be grateful every day and my motto right now is 'courage over comfort.'"



 

More Stories on Upworthy