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Boomers give 10 best pieces of advice to younger generation to help them live life to the fullest

A bunch of social media users who are presumably older than 55 years are sparing some essential life advice for people below 25.

Boomers give 10 best pieces of advice to younger generation to help them live life to the fullest
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

With age comes wisdom.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

There are instances when our generation feels lost and confused and those are the times when we turn to our elders for quality advice. They have lived longer than us, experienced more and have eventually gathered enough knowledge to show us a path whenever we are at a crossroads in our lives. Whether it is about making serious financial decisions, dilemmas related to relationship issues or having problems with taking care of our health, our guardian figures are always there to help us out with their best thoughts and wisdom. Recently, u/Content_Structure118 on Reddit asked the seniors in the community an interesting question which read: "People who are 55+ and happy with your life, what is your best advice to those under 25?" So, the generation of boomers assembled to spare their golden word of advice to those who need it and here is a list of the best guidance provided by them.

1. Maintain your health

Representative Image Source: Pexels | William Choquette
Representative Image Source: Pexels | William Choquette

Eat fairly healthy and get daily exercise. I'm now 72 and still run 40 miles/week. However, I have friends 10 years younger than me who can hardly walk to the mailbox. Getting old isn't bad at all if you can still get out, travel, go out to eat, play catch with your grandson and enjoy life. But, you have to be healthy enough to do all those things. It's a lot easier to get into shape and keep it that way when you are in your 20s. If you wait, you may never start. u/Silly-Resist8306

2. Pick your career and partner wisely

Representative Image Source: Pexels/Gustavo Fring
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Gustavo Fring

The two biggest decisions are your career and your partner. Your career will probably change and it's not too bad to change but changing your partner can be a nightmare. My best advice is to be careful who you settle down with. The people I know my age who are unhappy are unhappy because they picked a bad partner. u/Inevitable-Staff9567. Yeah, it's amazing what was hidden, or the lengths my partner went to keep it hidden. Certain personality disorders exacerbate over time, and I'm right now experiencing Gone Girl levels of manipulation that started years in advance while I thought we were "doing the work." Nope. She was making plans to get the upper hand when she wanted to start the attack. I didn't know certain things I'd experienced were even possible. Be careful who you trust. u/Grantetons

3. Being alone is not being lonely

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anastasia Shuraeva
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anastasia Shuraeva

Also important to note that it is totally fine to choose to be alone. It does make life more difficult because the world is kind of built for double incomes/families, but it's doable. And wanting to stay alone is totally fine and normal. If you're the type that enjoys your own company, keep living the life you want and don't let society pressure you into getting into a forced living situation. As long as you have friends and social outlets, you'll be fine. For example, I definitely love living alone. u/beepborpimajorp

4. Save and invest wisely

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska

Learn how to save and invest money now. If you learn how to do this, 55-year-old you will be forever grateful to 25-year-old you. u/Alembicbass4. When I was 15 for my first paycheck my mom took 20% to save. She said if you just take that money out before it ever hits your spending you never notice it is gone. My stepdad later taught me how to invest it, albeit conservatively. I kept that up and when I got my first "real" job on my own I followed the same practice. I'm now 40 and those lessons have proved invaluable. I plan on doing the same for my son and daughter. I'll be able to retire early and comfortably when many of my coworkers and friends/family will not be able to. u/MindTuna

5. Don't judge others blindly

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Keira Burton
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Keira Burton

Act in good faith. This is fantastically underestimated. Cultivate curiosity, and eschew judgment. Tend to your relationships, even when - and especially when - you don't feel like it. Prioritize being your best, physically, emotionally and mentally. u/joemondo.  In regard to 'eschew judgment'. I cannot believe how much better my life became when I stopped being a judgemental person. I had a lot of hard lessons until I figured it out, but it is the single most important change I made for personal growth. u/greatnorth2615

6. Be goal-oriented

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Polina Zimmerman
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Polina Zimmerman

Be patient and pursue meaningful goals. u/Pretend_Tea6261. The dude I met a bunch of years ago was 51 when he quit, went to school for a bit, started a business that he loved, and made more money between 51 and 65 than he did his whole life before that. Had way more fun too. u/craigestar. I have decided to finally pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. It could take 15 years to accomplish. I'm still determined to do it and it has become the most meaningful goal I've ever set, it motivates me on a daily basis like nothing else before. u/unduedisrespect

7. Stop comparing yourself to others

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Polina Zimmerman
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Polina Zimmerman

Chase what makes you happy, not what you feel obligated to please parents (for example). Don’t compare yourself to others: it will suck the joy from your life. u/DogDrools. Also useful advice: "Think for yourself" doesn't mean "do the opposite of what you're told". Actually thinking for yourself means evaluating all the evidence available to you independently and coming to your own conclusions. If you're doing this right, you'll find yourself agreeing with random people that you hate simply out of pure chance. If you find that all of your positions are in complete opposition to some famous person or organization, that might be a sign that you aren't truly as independent as you think you are. u/nostrademons

8. There is nothing called perfection

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alexas Fotos
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alexas Fotos

Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good. Sometimes you need to be happy with what you have, it won’t get better but it could definitely get worse. u/londoner4life. In the dev world, I usually aspire to do "good enough". It means everything is working as it should per specification, it is tested and verified and optimized to the point of "this works well for this situation". If there are some bugs, that's okay, we learn from them the most. If I try to optimize everything and perfect everything, I'm behind my estimates, I don't deliver what I'm supposed to and it reflects on everything else. I apply this approach to almost everything in my life. u/liv2learn994

9. Take more risks while you can

Image Source: Pexels/ Photo by Ksenia Chernaya
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Photo by Ksenia Chernaya

Enjoy life. Live within means. Diversify investments. Stay out of debt. Take risk x 2. Learn another culture. See somewhere in the world that is amazing and create lifetime friends. u/GPointeMointaineer. Yeah I mean risk and reward tend to correlate. This advice isn’t telling you to follow the voice in your head telling you to go remortgage the house for Bitcoin but rather “if you have an opportunity where there’s some risk but the reward would likely be more than worth it and you’re on the fence about it, just do it”. Like yeah, you might get unlucky and fail but if you don’t take any opportunity except what’s certain you never had a chance to succeed. u/sevseg_decoder

10. Don't care about people's opinion

Representative Image Source: Pexels | 
Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

Don't care about what anybody thinks of you. u/BlueGreen_1956. I try to remember how many people fall in and out of our lives. The fellow soccer moms, PTA parents, and neighbors are likely to be history once the kids grow, or you move or whatever. Many of these people are temporary acquaintances that you may enjoy the time you have with, but you are one life change away from never seeing them again. I live in a smaller city where my daughter went to school all 13 years, since she graduated over 2 years ago I have run into other parents from her school/activities exactly twice. Why did I care so much what they thought? I sure don’t know. If any of them become actual true friends then you don’t have to worry about what they think, because real friends do not do bad things to their friends. u/stackedtotherafters

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