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Adorable baby with hemangioma features in Little Sleepies ad in yet another win for representation

All babies are precious and every parent deserves to see their child's uniqueness being appreciated.

Adorable baby with hemangioma features in Little Sleepies ad in yet another win for representation
Cover Image Source: Instagram | littlesleepies

Everyone is special in their own way and babies are no different. While we have been seeing an increase in representation of diverse people in television, film and ads, babies are not far behind. All babies are precious and every parent deserves to see their child's uniqueness being appreciated. This is why it's heartwarming to see Little Sleepies, a bamboo pajama brand for kids, feature a baby with a forehead hemangioma in a September ad.

Hemangiomas are a red type of birthmark made of rapidly dividing cells of blood vessel walls. Cleveland Clinic describes hemangiomas as a type of growth that appears as red or purple lumps on your skin. It can form anywhere on the body, with more than half growing on a person's head and neck. Most of them are not life-threatening and usually disappear over time. According to the outlet, most begin shrinking in size when a baby is 12 to 18 months old and usually disappear by age 10.



 

As for Little Sleepies, they plan to advance the cause for representation by giving a platform to a diverse group of baby models, including a baby with special needs. "As a family-focused brand, it's important to us that all families can see themselves in our sleepwear and daywear. We featured a baby named Mila with a hemangioma during our recent Halloween campaign," Salpy Talian, Sr. Art Director at Little Sleepies, told Motherly. "As a result, we've received an outpouring of love and appreciation from our community for showing children like theirs. When our Holiday Collection launches, our friend Riley, who has special needs, will make her debut. Inclusiveness is at the heart of everything we do at Little Sleepies."


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Little Sleepies (@littlesleepies)


 

Many parents welcomed the introduction of a baby with hemangioma by sharing their views on Instagram. @mkohler214 wrote, "I came here to comment on the hemangioma also! My baby girl has one and it makes me so happy to see this beautiful baby in your ad! It definitely makes me want to support your business more!!!" @lyndsey4783 added, "I've already been a big fan of Little Sleepies, but featuring a baby with a hemangioma just solidified my love. My baby girl also has a hemangioma. I love love love this representation."

More and more brands are working towards diverse model representation in their advertising and marketing efforts. One of the most prominent baby brands to do this is Gerber, having featured many babies as part of its advertising campaign. In 2022, they featured Isa Slish of Edmond, Oklahoma. The infant is the first Gerber baby with a limb difference. Isa was born with a congenital femoral deficiency, a rare condition that can lead to an incomplete leg. "She is fun-loving, a joyous little girl. She loves to laugh and giggle," Meredith Slish, Isa's mom, told Good Morning America. "She's wonderful and we're so lucky to have her."


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Gerber (@gerber)


 

In 2020, the company featured Magnolia Earl, the first-ever adopted Gerber baby, who has the most infectious smile. The adorable baby won the title from over 327,000 entries and "captured the hearts of the judging panel with her joyful expression, playful smile and warm, engaging gaze," Gerber said in a press release at the time. The company added that the Earl family's story "serves as a reminder of what unites all parents and drives everyone at Gerber: the promise to do anything for the baby."


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Gerber (@gerber)


 

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